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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Spencer Ia 51
    Posts
    39

    Post

    I have a table saw and would like to make rabbet joints. I would like some feed back on the type of dado blades you're using and the type to buy. Thanks Darrell

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I got mine at the local hardware store. I bought what they call a stack dado set. I think it is 6 1/2 or 7 inches for the two outside blades. The rest are called chippers. The two blades cut the smooth sides, and the chippers take out the middle. I was taught, when you put the chippers in the middle, to offset the blades. If you have two chippers, put them 90 degrees apart. If you have 3, put them at 60s ect. In other words, space them evenly.

    I use mine almost daily, but then I build all of my stuff too. After a while, you can get really inventive on how to make bee stuff. I did some things I never would have even thought about. But for making notch cuts, the are straight, and very good. The only thing you need to worry about, is depth, but after a while you almost know. I had cabinetmaking and millwork in Vo-Tech in high school, so I have been exposed to alot of different things. Unfortunately, I don't have the equipment they do, so I make do. Twenty years later, I am trying to remember all the shortcuts. They come, some too late but hey what the heck.



    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I see the box joint plans are still being redesigned. The jig I made uses the two miter rails on the saw. I made a fence to go between them, that is square. Next I determined the blade thickness, or the size of the finger to be made. After setting blades to the size of the finger, I ran the fence thru the blade. This makes a notch in the fence. Then measure over to the left of the fence, the same distance or thickness. Make another notch. Cut a piece if scrap, t to fit that, and secure it to the fence. At this point, go back to the original notch, and put it in the middle of the blade, and mark the rails. Mount it to the rails. The jig is now made.
    Using it! The first piece to be cut, slide the board into the scrap, and run it thru. Now, you have a notch in the board. Now, put that notch into the scrap piece, and run again. Continue until there is no more board. Even if the last cut is only half of the blade thickness. Now the next piece. Obviously, it can't be done the same way, or it won't line up. This piece needs to be offset a bit. Start by sliding the board over to the edge of the blade by the scrap piece and cut. The corner should be taken off of the board. Now slide it into the scrap, and continue as before. Once you are done, and the blade was the right depth, everything should go together. I need a block of wood and hammer to set the joints, but a tight joint is better anyway. I nail them 3 nails on one side of the joint, and 3 on the other. This box will not come apart!

    Sometimes depending on the wood you are using, it pays to predrill holes for the nails. If you get into hardwood like oak, or walnut, it helps alot.

    My next project is going to be a six frame observation hive. I have too much work right now, but soon! I want it to look nice, so I will use box joints, more for the look than the strength. I hope it comes out alright. Who knows...



    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

    [This message has been edited by Hook (edited November 16, 2002).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,995

    Post

    I recently replaced two old dull dado sets with a new 6" carbide set. I think it cost a whopping $181.00. I was having a hard time finding shop to sharpen the 25 yr. old ones.

    It cuts like butter and was using it just today. The woodworking for beekeeping is one of my favorite pastimes, cost is no object when it comes to the bees. How many hobbies can you find that pays for itself, and can be a business expense at the same time ? ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,605

    Post

    Hi Darrell -

    If you are going to be doing anything but the fewest of cuts, you really need to look at getting a carbide tipped blade. In fact, finding a non carbide tipped blade is hard to do anymore. You do not need a dado blade set to make rabbet joints. Rabbets can be made just as well with a single blade using two cuts instead of a single one that a dado blade could do it in. The only time a dado blade is invaluable is when you need to actually cut a dado joint, or in this case, a joint that requires the same shape like a box joint. Here, nothing will match a high quality carbide tipped dado blade set. I paid $100 for mine almost 18 years ago. It's a Freud brand, 8", and I've had it sharpened several times, and still making perfect cuts. Using the stacked dado blades gives you perfectly square bottoms, unlike the "wobble" type dado blade that gives a slight rounded bottom.

    BTW, you can still get the old plans for the box joint while waiting for the new page to be done. http://www.beesource.com/plans/boxjoint/index1.htm

    Regards,
    Barry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Spencer Ia 51
    Posts
    39

    Post

    Thanks every one for your info. I'll be getting my dado blade soon and be in business. Darrell

  7. #7

    Post

    hello
    thought I would put my two cents in too
    I got a carbite daddo from sears for only $39.00 but harbor sells one that is $11.95 both are adjustable used mine for yrs
    you can make yourhandles too=but don't try it on a radial saw only a table saw.
    Don

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