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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    I've been painting supers all afternoon. Had to put a wire wheel brush into
    my handdrill first to take off loose paint and misc stuff. Then had to
    tighten nails and/or replace them with either bigger ones or drywall screws
    to get the supers corners to tighten down. A few supers, I had to put metal
    corners on after puttying in where dovetail ends were needing fill.

    Question: How do you all repair supers and equipment? How do you paint them
    also? Roller, brush, spray? What type of paint? oil base, latex, stain ? Do
    you brand?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,459

    Post

    Howdy Dee -

    The only repair I've had to do to my supers are paint them. I started this summer with a few of them. Painted them in the field with a brush but next time I'll use a mini roller. I use acrylic house paint.

    As you know, I'll be starting soon to make about 30 medium supers. That equates to 300 frames. Care to describe how you make your frames? I think you said you use 2X4 stock, and just rip 3/8" strips off it for the frame sides? I have a 14" band saw that I'm going to set up with a 1/2" aggressive blade and try it. Should be easier than using the table saw as the kerf is so small. Do you taper the bottom halves of the frame sides? Do you leave the top bar ends square or cut outside corners off? Questions, questions.

    -Barry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    20

    Question

    I read in Dave Cushman's site about using vaseline on abutting surfaces to minimize sticking with propolis. Anyone do that here?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    This is in reply to Barry's post of 11-29-00 at 12:30 AM

    Barry wrote:

    Care to describe how you make your frames? I think you said you use 2X4 stock, and just rip 3/8" strips off it for the frame sides?

    Reply:

    Yes, you can use 2 x 4, 2 x 6 or larger 2 by stock, and just rip 3/8" strips off it for the frame sides, just like cutting meat or Italian bread.

    Barry further wrote:

    Do you taper the bottom halves of the frame sides? Do you leave the top bar ends square or cut outside corners off?

    Reply:

    Yes, the bottom halves of the frame sides can easily be tapered with a jointer or table saw or even a band saw.

    We square cut the top bar ends and then run a coarse file on the outside corners to blunt them.

    The grooves on the ends of the frames are done by use of an adjustable dado blade on a tablesaw with the wider groove where the top of the endbar would be.

    Now also to mention, we use solid bottom bars and do not cut a groove in them but instead mount the foundation about 1/4" inch or so of the bottom bar. The reason for this is to eliminate egg laying for wax worms, as this is one of the first places they lay given a chance. Practice this with solid bottom bars and wax worm troubles will be lessened quite a bit.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    WeDee asked what kind of paint others use.The local hardware store accumulates 'mis-mixed' paint.I go in and check from time to time and buy all their exterior acrylic latex for 5 bucks a gallon.This is top of the line stuff.I dont worry about color as we dont keep bees in hot country,but just mix it all together in a 5 gal.bucket then slop it on with a brush.
    I like to make my own frames when there is time.We use med.honey supers and I like to use 9 self spacing frames,the end bars sliced 3/8" thick off of 2by4 stock.I prefer the end bars square without a taper.I drill 2 holes in each end bar then use wire.I also use a solid bottom bar,with a grooved top bar.A crimp wired 4 3/4" wax foundation is then electrically embedded.In a good flow the bees will pull these 9 frames out all the way to bottom bar.We also have factory frames that we use 9 to the box after they are drawn.I dont like these as well because they have to be hand spaced and never seem to be just right like the wider end bar frames.All our hives are in a single deep brood chamber during the summer,and the mediums are stacked above an excluder(usually).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    WeDee?sorry Dee,a typo.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    ashland, ma usa
    Posts
    6

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Don:
    I read in Dave Cushman's site about using vaseline on abutting surfaces to minimize sticking with propolis. Anyone do that here?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Hi Don and all
    I am reading the notes on the forums about smearing Vaseline on the edges of the supers to make them easier to separate when removing. When you make the super, just make a small rabbit on the bottom of each super. This rabbit is on the outside edge, about 1/8th inch high and about ΒΌ inch deep. It only has to be about 1 and 1/2 inch long. Make one on each side of the super. On the inside, the bees do not know it is there. On the outside you see a small 1/8th inch groove 1/4 inch deep. Place your hive tool in the groove and pry the super off. This should bee faster then Vaseline.
    Thank you
    Forrest Zielke


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    I should point out that if you move your bees around to catch various honeyflows,having everything glued together with propolis is a good thing.It keeps your lids from sailing off the load and going through the radiator of the Mercedes behind you!If the weather is warm enough to be pulling out frames,the propolis on the frames is usually no great hindrance.What I am trying to say is I see no reason to go to any extra effort to keep equipment from getting propolized.just my opinion.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    Hi Dee,You mentioned putting on corner braces.I saw these in the picture of your hives on the cover of one of the bee magazines awhile back.I remember thinking thats a useful item.Where do you get them?Do you have them custom made locally?Another useful item I like are the metal frame savers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    This is in reply to loggermike's post of 12-03-2000 at 11:10 AM

    Mike wrote:

    Hi Dee,You mentioned putting on corner braces.

    I remember thinking thats a useful item.Where do you get them?Do you have them custom made locally?

    Reply:

    Well Mike, I make them myself. I go to the local hardware store and buy rolls of aluminum tin sheeting 4" wide and then cut it to length and bend the corner in a bending brake.

    Then all that is left to do is nail with long frame nails to the corners, bending the points of the nails down inside, so the corners don't come off. Then if the corners need filling to level again the woodenware, it's easy to fill the gap created between the metal corner and the wooden super with putty or silicone sealer. Finish with painting.

    Hope this helps you.

    Sincerely,

    Dee

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    Thanks Dee,that is information I can use.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eolia, Mo., USA
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Dee,

    As for the use of drywal screws, I would recomend deck screws. Drywal screws will rust quite quickly where as deck screws are made to be outside. They look very much like drywal screws, but can be bought in various lengths and diameters. Galvanized would be best.
    Gene

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,459

    Post

    Hi Dee, Mike -

    I went ahead and posted a photo Dee sent me showing the corner braces/repairs on one of their hives. See it here: http://www.enteract.com/~bbirkey/corners.htm

    -Barry

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    ashland, ma usa
    Posts
    6

    Post


    Hi Dee
    Your Quote
    (Well Mike, I make them myself. I go to the local hardware store and buy rolls of aluminum tin sheeting 4" wide and then cut it to length and bend the corner in a bending brake.)

    In the building trade, we use a product called corner strips. This is a metal strip eight or ten feet long, used to brace the outside corner of drywall installation. It is only about one dollar per strip. It comes at the 45 degree you use. All you have to do, is cut it to length with a tin snips. It also has the holes to drive screws.
    This may save you some work.
    Thank you, Forrest

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    This is in reply to Sailingcat's post of 12-07-2000, 09:32 AM

    Sailingcat wrote:

    In the building trade, we use a product called corner strips. This is a metal strip eight or ten feet long, used to brace the outside corner of drywall installation. It is only about one dollar per strip. It comes at the 45 degree you use. All you have to do, is cut it to length with a tin snips. It also has the holes to drive screws.
    This may save you some work.
    Thank you, Forrest


    Reply:

    Tried using these, but the drywall corner strips were not wide enough to cover the dovetails, or at least the ones sold in our local area and the holes were not positioned properly for a super for nailing.

    Have used 2" galvanized corner flashing with good results though, but have found the rolls of 4" aluminum to be cheaper to use. Bought an inexpensive bender brake from Harbor Freight to bend the corners with, after cutting to length with aviation snips.

    Thanks for your reply though.

    Dee

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Hi figured I add my thoughts about using vasoline on woodenware,especially on surfaces inside the hive.

    Now I do not want to be disrespectful to those using vasoline or petroleum jelly on wooden surfaces to keep honeybees from propolizing, but I do not find this a very healthful practice for beekeepers to do.

    I believe this because propolis is used by the bees to shellac all the surfaces of the inside of the colony to keep viral,bacterial, and fungal diseases under control and is an intergral part of their keeping a steril environment and therefore healthy bees and therefore wholesome products to harvest.

    To smear vasoline or petroleum jelly is to smear an oil based product that only serves to catch and hold dust and dirt and hive contaminates in my point of view, that can only add to colony distress and disease incidences.

    Comments on other points of view!!

    Dee

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Well, though I will still be painting and repairing supers thru the spring months, I am now fixing tops and bottoms and inner covers for a change of pace.

    Right now I am replacing bottom runners on tops and bottoms with 2x4 stock for more support. I start with tops, then those that get older and can no longer be used for tops, I convert to bottom boards.

    Besides using 2x4 stock for replacing old, more narrower bottom runners, on the tops I am converting to bottom boards, I am making new side rails (3/8") for the supers to set upon.

    In doing so, I am going from 1 by to 2 by slices of wood, to give the supers more suport when set down; Also, so if there is any shifting on the bottom board, the stacks will not open a gap so readily or todder so easily.

    Cracks and holes in wood I'm filling with 15yr silicone sealant and then putting a thin strip of aluminum over. I am also changing out loose nails for either bigger ones or drywall screws to get everything tight.

    Inner covers I cannot repair, I am converting, from solid to wire screen centers, for use now as division boards.

    All inner covers are being altered, so that they can be used as inner covers or solid division boards (or even emergency bottom boards or top covers). I want ample division boards of both types (solid/screened center) ready for spring(since both are used differently). I am stapling with # 8 wire.

    How do some of you repair your tops and bottoms and inner covers?

    Dee

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dee A. Lusby:
    I've been painting supers all afternoon. Had to put a wire wheel brush into
    my handdrill first to take off loose paint and misc stuff. Then had to
    tighten nails and/or replace them with either bigger ones or drywall screws
    to get the supers corners to tighten down. A few supers, I had to put metal
    corners on after puttying in where dovetail ends were needing fill.

    Question: How do you all repair supers and equipment? How do you paint them
    also? Roller, brush, spray? What type of paint? oil base, latex, stain ? Do
    you brand?

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    forget trying to rip 2x4,s to make frames at less than one dollar per frame, let dadants make them and witha few basic tolls make a frame jig and assemble 10 frames at a time. if you only take on suggestion , remember what im about to say, if you buy used equipment you are most likely buying someone elses problems, with the cost of a completey new hive 2 9-5/8" deep bodies at approx 60 dollars, it doesnt make a whole lot of sense to deiscover you have a case of afb from your used equipment, if you monkey with used equipment you will become a beliver in what i am saying. joel johnson

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dee A. Lusby:
    This is in reply to loggermike's post of 12-03-2000 at 11:10 AM

    Mike wrote:

    Hi Dee,You mentioned putting on corner braces.

    I remember thinking thats a useful item.Where do you get them?Do you have them custom made locally?

    Reply:

    Well Mike, I make them myself. I go to the local hardware store and buy rolls of aluminum tin sheeting 4" wide and then cut it to length and bend the corner in a bending brake.

    Then all that is left to do is nail with long frame nails to the corners, bending the points of the nails down inside, so the corners don't come off. Then if the corners need filling to level again the woodenware, it's easy to fill the gap created between the metal corner and the wooden super with putty or silicone sealer. Finish with painting.

    Hope this helps you.

    Sincerely,

    Dee
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    using any type of silicone or putty on your hive equpment is asking for at a minimum lost customers and possibly worse, never use any paints, putty, sealers ect on any parts inside your hive, this is one of the golden rules of beekeeping keeping you honey pure fit for human consumption

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,459

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by joelz:
    never use any paints, putty, sealers ect on any parts inside your hive,<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Hello Joelz -

    I didn't see anything in Dee's remarks that would indicate she uses any of your mentioned items INSIDE the hive. I gave a URL in a previous post showing the repair corners mentioned. Please have a look. All the repairs take place on the outside of the hive.
    http://www.enteract.com/~bbirkey/corners.htm

    Regards,
    Barry

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