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  1. #1
    3 BeeKeepers Guest

    Question

    Has anyone ever wintered colonies in a heated garage? We are going to try this since we started some packages off for the spring, although didn't have enough time to gather honey.

    Any information of the do's & don't's is greatly apprieciated.

    Best Regards,

    John 3-BeeKeepers / beekeepers3@yahoo.com

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Richmond, VA USA
    Posts
    34

    Post

    I would think your biggest problem would be to not fool the bees into thinking it was 50 degrees fahrenheit outside when it was really 10 below.

  3. #3
    3 BeeKeepers Guest

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Glenn West:
    I would think your biggest problem would be to not fool the bees into thinking it was 50 degrees fahrenheit outside when it was really 10 below.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


    Glen, yes I thought that earlier. I was thinking that if I went to a temperature where the queens will start laying and produce a larger package when spring rolls around. I have hive top feeders of which will eliminate them coming out with entrance screens. I purchased those from Bushy Mountain Bee Store.

    Have you heard of anyone doing this at all?

    Best Regards,
    John
    beekeepers3@yahoo.com


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Naples, Maine
    Posts
    41

    Post

    Hi, I hope that the "Entrance Screens" that you are going to use will not prevent the bees from leaving the hive. Remember, the bees, like us, occasionally need to go to the bathroom (cleansing flight). If you keep them in the hive they will contract Dysentary and kill off the entire hive. Also, keeping them in the garage will make a mess out of the garage if they can cleanse. Frankly, I wouldn't mess with the natural way of doing things. I've found that instinct will provide the best results. You can try what I do here in Maine... Place the inner cover on top of the second brood chamber. Then, place a piece of screen over the inner cover's hole. Next, set an empty super above the inner cover and fill it with clean, dry wood shavings to provide an "insulated attic" for the bees. Last, place the outer cover over the super. Done.

    Good Luck,
    Paul

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Richmond, VA USA
    Posts
    34

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by 3 BeeKeepers:


    Have you heard of anyone doing this at all?

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    There is/was a website that described an individual who kept hives in a spare bedroom in his/her house. The room was unheated and the hives were oriented so that they had direct access to the outside. And I believe in parts of Europe they use beehouses (with outside access). I also think some beekeepers used to use cool, dark rootcellars and confined the bees. I would think that there are few places in the US where one would have to go to the extreme of providing shelter inside a building. I agree with Paul B regarding cleansing flights and the mess that might be made in the garage. I have heard of those who wrap their hives in tar paper or other waterproof material and provide insulation above and perhaps around the hive in northern climates such as yours. However, here in central Virginia, our climate is pretty mild so I'm lucky enough to have to do nothing special. So I don't have first-hand knowledge of these techniques for over-wintering.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by 3 BeeKeepers:
    Has anyone ever wintered colonies in a heated garage? We are going to try this since we started some packages off for the spring, although didn't have enough time to gather honey.

    Any information of the do's & don't's is greatly apprieciated.
    why would you want to winter them in your garage? provide ample stores and a wind barrier and the bees will take care of themselves like the have since the beginning of time, think about it, how have they survived without garages? beekeepers are measured by their skills to overwinter hives
    Best Regards,

    John 3-BeeKeepers / beekeepers3@yahoo.com

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Tecumseh, OK 74873
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Go to http://www.gobeekeeping.com/LAA.htm and read Dr. Miller's "A Year among the bees" which they have a scanned copy of online. This is exactly what he did back in the 1880s, except he overwintered his hives in a cellar. He provides a lot of detail.

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