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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    hello barry sorry my mistake, i thought inner covers, top and bottom boards were inside the hive and as for buying materials to fix a worn out corner on a hive body you have done exactly that, fix ed a worn out hive body and what do you have? a worn out hive body i dont know about youn but with the price of a commercial hive body around eight dollars i will spend my time managing my hives, finding new markets and not working on equipment that should be repalced... joel

    [This message has been edited by Admin (edited December 22, 2001).]

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Joel wrote:
    hello barry sorry my mistake, i thought inner covers, top and bottom boards were inside the hive

    Reply:
    They are inside a hive and that is why the paint is on the outside surfaces only. and also why metal covers are placed over anything detrimental, whether flat surface or corner.

    Joel also wrote:
    and as for buying materials to fix a worn out corner on a hive body you have done exactly that, fix ed a worn out hive body and what do you have? a worn out hive body i dont know about youn but with the price of a commercial hive body around eight dollars i will spend my time managing my hives, finding new markets and not working on equipment that should be repalced.

    Reply:
    Sorry, but I can repair many supers in a days time to make it well worth the cost. after all it doesn't take even one hour normally to fix an old super. Besides our equipment has never seen chemicals, essential oils and acids, etc and after years of usage, I consider it better then freshly cut lumber that is often treated, not cured and of lesser quality grained wood then that sold years ago.

    Super properly kept and maintained keep and service for several decades. Further, the bees themselves seem to prefer them better.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    freshly cut lumber is treated?? with what air? and your bees prefer old supers? how can you tell?? painting and cleaning bodies and supers for sure trying to repair damaged corners and hole with putty and sealants, sound nice to sit around on a rainy day smearing putty and sealant on your equipment but its foolish

    [This message has been edited by Admin (edited December 22, 2001).]

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,299

    Post

    Joel,Didnt you ever hear the saying"waste not,want not"?An old farmer once told me the way to get good equipment cheap was to pick it up after the young farmer who thought he had to have all new equipment went broke.That is the economics of agriculture in general and beekeeping in particular,and isnt going to change until the dollar weakens and we are no longer drowning in cheap imported honey!-Mike

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by loggermike:
    Joel,Didnt you ever hear the saying"waste not,want not"?An old farmer once told me the way to get good equipment cheap was to pick it up after the young farmer who thought he had to have all new equipment went broke.That is the economics of agriculture in general and beekeeping in particular,and isnt going to change until the dollar weakens and we are no longer drowning in cheap imported honey!-Mike<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    sorry to disagree, back when i was a new beekeeper i purchased cheap used equipment from a old beekeeper, and later that year i had a outbreak of afb from the used equipment, luckily, due to regular hive inspections, i was able to quarrentine my bees and avoided a major outbreak, beekeeping in particular is quite different than other types of agriculturial farming, sur use old bargin equipment, beware afb spores can survive over fifty years,personally i dont compete with cheap imported honey, there is no comparison to the honey produced here in the u.s., that is the main selling point of locally produced honey, joel

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