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Thread: Fogging time?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Blythewood, SC
    Posts
    149

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    Going to start fogging for the first time and I just wanted to know how long I should fog each hive? A couple of seconds? Or longer.
    Thanks for any help.

    Patrick
    "To escape criticism-do nothing, say nothing, be nothing."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Jamesport Long Island NY
    Posts
    150

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    Pgg

    The idea is for the fog to reach alll the way to the top of the hive on the inside. You can take off the outer cover and watch for the fog at the inner cover hole if you have one, take the inner cover off if you don't have a hole. You will get the idea real quick. Its not rocket science. You don't have to be real exact. I have been fogging for two years now with good results. I fog every week without fail if the weather allows as long as the bees are flying.
    Good luck

    Bill Schaefer
    "Keeping bees for over 50 years and starting to get the hang of it"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Blythewood, SC
    Posts
    149

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    Thanks for the help Bill.
    "To escape criticism-do nothing, say nothing, be nothing."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,336

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    When I was fogging, I liked to watch for it to come out the inner cover when you're getting a feel for it. Once you know about how long it takes you can skip taking the covers off to watch.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

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    I fog for 5 seconds at each hive and cover the screen on the SBB with a piece of paper then I remove the paper unless I want to take a mite drop count from the fogging. I then coat the paper with FGMO and leave it in for 24 hours. I do drop tests on some hives 24 hours before and for 24 hours after so I can see if my fogging is working.

    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    248

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    If you are using a hive top feeder I assume it should be removed and replaced with the inner cover for the treatment?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,336

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    &gt;If you are using a hive top feeder I assume it should be removed and replaced with the inner cover for the treatment?

    It isn't going to hurt the feeder. But why would you still have it on?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    248

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    Michael the feeder is on both of my hives. One hive is thriving so is it time to stop feeding although they are taking the 1 to 1 quickly? I will inspect Saturday and I'll bring the third medium in anticipation of hive being 75% drawn.
    The other hive is waiting for the new queen to emerge and start laying. I think it will be a few more weeks.(queen cell (s) 11 +-days old) You may recall I foolishly eliminated queen cells while a caged queen was being introduced in a new nuc several weeks ago. She was not accepted and I was left " hopelessly queenless" (your words) Should I be feeding this hive while waiting or also remove the feeded from this one?
    My advice from many here has been feed till they stop taking it. I value your advice and everyone here however sometimes it is conflicting.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,336

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    &gt;My advice from many here has been feed till they stop taking it.

    It's a common piece of advice. But once you overcrowd a package into swarming by feeding too much, you'll probably reconsider it.

    &gt; I value your advice and everyone here however sometimes it is conflicting.

    My advice is often conflicting. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

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    I am never conflicted, or am I? Well, I guess sometimes I am.....

    When you feed you have to pay attention to the brood chamber. This can be as easy as a tip of the box to estimate the "heft".

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    248

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    Feeders are being removed now. Besides there are many flowers and trees in full bloom here. I am not sure which the bees like but there must be some, since there are so many to choose from. Should i also remove the feeder from the hive with the developing queen cells?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    248

    Post

    Feeders are being removed now. Besides there are many flowers and trees in full bloom here. I am not sure which the bees like but there must be some, since there are so many to choose from. Should i also remove the feeder from the hive with the developing queen cells?

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