Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    An organic beekeeper near me says that he fogs but sometimes soaks wool, cotton or some other organic material in FGMO and places it on top of the frames. He claims that in the process of chewing it up and dragging it to the front door it spreads it around the hive well enough to control mites. What do you all think? I think it's worth a try and would be pretty easy to do. Theresa.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Dr R has a method using cords (upulstory cord) soaked in FGMO and thymol. Same concept

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Perhaps someone still has the recipe???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Excerpt from Dr R's paper prior to his departure.


    FGMO-THYMOL FORMULA FOR CORDS AND BURGESS FOGGER
    (Do not use thymol in your formula with honey supers on)
    The purpose of the FGMO-Thymol for these formulae is to obtain a concentration of thymol no higher than 5.49% thymol for the fogger and 2.53% thymol for the emulsion soaked cords.

    Emulsion soaked cords

    1000 cc mineral oil @ 0.86 density
    (*) (860 grams (30.34 oz.))
    100 grams (3.53 oz.) thymol
    1000 grams honey (2-1/4 pounds)
    1000 grams beeswax (2-1/4 pounds)
    100 pieces of cotton cord (40 inches long each)
    Add the weight of the ingredients without the cords
    Divide into 100 grams thymol

    Thus:
    100 = 2.53 % thymol
    3960 total weight

    [size="1"][ March 28, 2006, 06:43 PM: Message edited by: Sundance ][/size]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    gardenbees
    Dr.Pedro Rodriguez has spent some 12 years testing,changing,improving and developing his protocol with FGMO as a varroa control.The last 3 plus years I spent liasing with him with the view to having FGMO approved for use in New Zealand beehives.New Zealand has been the first in the world to gain approval for use to a code of practice.Initially the cord that Dr.Rodriguez used was torn up and removed from the hive by the bees.He has been very carefull when selecting mediums for the FGMO emulsion so that they will not end up in the honey.The cord he now uses is not torn up by the bees and is recycled in the prepared emulsion before it becomes propolised by the bees.Sundance has posted the formula.It is important to make it very clear that raw FGMO will kill bees.The cords are only to be soaked in the prepared emulsion as per the formula of Dr.Rodriguez.At the present Time Dr.Rodriguez is not well.I suggest you email him at DronebeeR@netscape.net He is scheduled to return to Spain about now.He will reply,but it must be remembered he has upto 300 messages a day.Keep trying.
    BOB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,654

    Post

    >An organic beekeeper near me says that he fogs but sometimes soaks wool, cotton or some other organic material in FGMO and places it on top of the frames. He claims that in the process of chewing it up and dragging it to the front door it spreads it around the hive well enough to control mites. What do you all think?

    As everyone has pointed out, this is just a variation on Dr. Rodriguez's method. His has been worked out to be more effective, but it's probbaly somewhat effective.

    > I think it's worth a try and would be pretty easy to do.

    Just painting some on the top bars is even eaiser. [img]smile.gif[/img] But the cords last longer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Is the thymol that's mentioned in the recipe the same as Mita-A-thol that's sold by Brushy Bee and others? Does anyone know if thyme essential oil will do the same thing? And none of this should be done with the honey supers in place right? Theresa.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    No to essential oil. No to Mita thol, that menthol.

    ApiLifeVar (spelling) is a thymol product.

    Thymol crystals or powder (99.99% pure) will do the job.

    An yes, it should not be used just prior to and during honey flow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    TAVARES FLA US
    Posts
    193

    Post

    Hi Theresa, If you get a chance write to the Good Dr. and he will be more than glad to answer all your questions. If you go by the way Pedro has tested you will be sure not to make any mistakes. Take care JJ

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Where do you all get the thymol? The apilife var that I have seen comes in wafers not crystals. Do you grind the wafers up to make a powder? I don't feel right bothering the doctor especially if he's in ill health and has to answer so many emails daily. Hope you all don't mind my questions. Theresa.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,654

    Post

    >Where do you all get the thymol?

    Drug stores can usually order it. Other places on the web sell it.

    >The apilife var that I have seen comes in wafers not crystals. Do you grind the wafers up to make a powder?

    No. You need thymol crystals.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    ApiLifeVar is a mixture of lots of stuff with some thymol crystals incorporated.

    Thymol shouldn't cost you more than $15 for 100 grams.

    Drug store is a good lead.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Gardenbees, I sent you a PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Thanks all of you. I will be giving this a try this fall. I didn't treat last fall and hope I don't live to regret it. I have many hobbies but this one has the sharpest learning curve of any of them. Theresa.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    My learning curve was nearly vertical last year!!!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    I've been at it for 30 years and my learning curve still hasn't crested.

    Gardenbees, do you know how to read a pm??

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Yes, I got the pm. I think I'll try to find some thymol locally first but I'll send you a message if I run into trouble. Thanks for your help. Theresa.

    [size="1"][ March 30, 2006, 06:32 PM: Message edited by: gardenbees ][/size]

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    A french guy living in Chester, UK
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hi
    my fogger is broken (spreads only very hot FGMO), and not really happy to spend this amount of money on another one yet.

    I think i read somewhere on this forum, that at the begining, Dr Pedro used paper tissues covered in FGMO that he put on top of the hives, so i am very tempted to try but it seems like FGMO is dangerous for the bees if used by its own.
    I am a bit confused...
    can I use FGMO this way or not? (or could i also use some cords with only FGMO on them ?)
    If I can, how often do I need to replace the paper and what quantity can I use?

    I only have a few hives so the recipe for the cords given above seems like to be more for a commercial beekeeper than me!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,654

    Post

    The idea for the cords is to maximize the exposure to FGMO for that application. Since putting cords or towels in usually involves a trip to the yard and unstacking all the boxes on the hive, you want to get your money's worth out of that. The cords will last longer. The towels will only last about a day.

    You probably could use cords with just FGMO on them. I'm sure Dr. Rodriguez tried that but decides the emoulsion was more effective.

    I have just painted FGOM on the top bars and it's somewhat effective but only for a short time. It also keeps them from building burr comb between the boxes. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Post

    I know this is redundant, but this is how I apply this same principle. I take blue "shop" towels from Walmart or any other store, most often found in the auto parts department.

    I fold six shop towels over into 4 sections so they fit into a quart sized zip-lock baggy. Pour one cup of canola oil (the oil of my choice)and let them sit overnight. The oil is pretty much soaked up and the towels fully saturated.

    In the field, I simply lay the shop towel over the top bars of the brood nest, still folded. It doesn't matter if you unfold it.

    Some colonies shred it, some propolize it. Since I raise my own queens, I will choose my "breeder" queens from the shredding colonies. Though I don't know for sure, I think this shredding action is related to hygenic behavior.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads