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  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    I noticed that when I fogged my bees for the second time last week that some of the ones near the entrace died. Is the fog too hot or did they just get too much oil on them?
    HOW CLOSE IS TOO CLOSE for fogging?
    Jason

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    23

    Post

    It was more than likely too hot. I would recommend that you get a short 1 inch pvc pipe from the hardware store and hold it on the end of the fogger when fogging. They make a high heat pvc pipe. Just ask for it at the hardware store and they will know what you are referring to. You want a cool smoke going into your hive.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    Yes, you are too close. The fog right as it exits is VERY hot, but cools rapidly as it hits the air.

  4. #4
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Is there a way to permanently attach the PVC tube?
    What about drilling holes in the sides of the tube to allow the air to cool the fog more quickly?

    Should the tube be longer than one inch or this long enough?
    THANKS!!
    Jason

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I don't believe it will cool very much in the pipe. It is the dispersal into the air that cools it so much so quickly. When you have a lot of really small particles of oil spread out into a lot of air the surface area of the oil is huge and the heat is quickly dispersed. In a pipe it isn't going to spread out into the air much so I don't think it will cool much.

  6. #6
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    So no pipe?
    How close should I hold the fogger tip to the entrance AND for how long? I have heard 5 seconds is enough.
    Jason

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I don't really count time so much as I watch. If you have any kind of a vent box on top (and I usually do) you can see when the fog comes out the top. Even if you don't, you can pull the top and watch for fog coming out the inner cover. After a while you get a feel for how much it takes to fill a hive of any given size and you can skip taking the lid off.

    As for how far, try starting further away and as the bees flee the heat, move in closer. If you got too close too fast you will cook the bees at the entrance.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    From static tests to recommended fogger operating instructions I would suggest a distance of 100 mm from the hive entrance.AT this distance the average discharge temperature was 28.7 degrees celcius average over five dicharges at 16 degees ambient air temperature.Has anyone done checks in higher ambient teperatures.From an engineering point of view it would not be advisable to use any tube over or after the dicharge nozzle as this would condence the fog having negative affects.Dr Pedro has covered this before and it may be in the archives.A photo of Dr Pedro fogging hives appered in the American Bee Journal January 2003.

    [This message has been edited by Bob Russell (edited March 05, 2004).]

    [This message has been edited by Bob Russell (edited March 05, 2004).]

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