Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: BEEn Stung

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain Minnesota
    Posts
    182
    I am a new beekepper and have been using the FGMO method on my hives.
    A nearby eperienced beekepper stoped over the other day so I asked him to inspect my hives for mites. That is probably why he stoped in. Anyhow he had trouble finding a mite. He said, "Yopu have to have some". I didn't know , for sure, what they looked like. Finaly he did find ONE on the plastic below the screen bottom board.
    That is my testemonial to FGMO.

    ------------------
    Erwin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    Cords and all or just fogging?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain Minnesota
    Posts
    182

    Cool

    The works.
    Cords on all boxes every other week and fogging every week. Also SBB and catch plastic on bottom.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    Way to go!
    Remember the Dr. Rodriguez postulate: as in animal husbandry, (contented cows produce more milk),equated to honey bees, contented honey bees produce more honey.
    BEEn Stung: your practice can only lead to disease-free honey bees. Disease-free honey bees will return your efforts big time in production. Whether a commercial beekeeper or a hobbyist, bees return your time spent on them with greater returns. It is a basic principle in economics. Parasitic mites and now Small Hive Beetles have changed apiculure. Honey bees have to be managed properly and kept healthy. Mark my words. Day by day, there will be testimonials forthcoming from "happy campers" who are truly dedicated to care for their bees. Complaints about not being able to handle the extra labor will not give you any relieve. Those parasites are here to stay and one must take the extra time and effort to keep them out of our apiaries. At least keep their numbers down to the point that they do not interfere with our pleasure and profit.
    Best regards
    Dr. Rodriguez

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Hi
    It is interesting to note about the comment of been-stung about he "Experienced beekeeper ".
    I am not and will not claim to be such experienced beekeeper although bees came to me some time in the late 70 ties . As far as I am concerned . Bees are creatures which have constant surprises in stock . Research attests to that and thanks to all those who make a contribution , we still have bees supplying us with our daily food .
    The so called "Old beekeepers " Have the tendency of reluctance to change and at hardly ever try to experiment with alternate managements . Thus is the case with FGMO or other "Soft" approaches to the mite problem .
    The future will bring still other approaches to beekeeping and it behoves us to be alert to all suggestions via the marvelous tool presented by the "Internet " .
    Since there is yet no "Silver bullet " relative to Varroa we will have to endavor to support those with reasonable solutions such as "Soft chemical " applications and selective genetic breeding efforts ( Natural selection ).
    Special thanks from me to Dr Pedro Rodriguez , Dr. Marla Spivac and the host of other researchers giving us the opportunity to maintain our important insect and herewith our food supply .
    Happy beeing
    JDF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads