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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
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    12

    Post

    Hello... I am a beginning hobbyist beekeeper with only one hive that I set up this spring. I have read Dr. Rodriguez articles in the American Bee Journal with great interest. I am considering trying the FGMO treatment, though I need to test my hive to see how many mites I have first. The only question I have, that I haven't found an answer for in the literature, is where can I purchase the 8mm cotton cord? I am sure this is obvious to others, but not to me
    Thanks for any replies.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,423

    Post

    There has been much discussion on here and other boards I'm sure. Dr. Rodriguez gets upholstery cord, which you should be able to find in an upholster shop. Many people have recommended buying the cotton cord mops and cutting them up for cords.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
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    Post

    Thank You for the information...it will be very helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
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    553

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    Hello folks.
    The key word here is "cotton." Other cords as explained elswhere are not reliable for varied reasons.
    Also please remember to apply at least two yards (or two meters, if you prefer the metric system) of cords. Less cordage will be insufficient.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
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    12

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    Thank you Dr. Rodriquez for the extra information about the amount being two yards. As I was driving toward Ellsworth, Maine yesterday I noticed a local Upholstry shop along the way. I stopped in today and was greeted by a blonde laborador named Sierra and an older gentleman with his front teeth missing... Undeterred, I put forth my request for 8mm cotton cord. He said he had something but wasn't sure it was 8mm and by the way what did I want to use it for? As soon as I told him I was a beekeeper his eyes lit up and he continued to tell me about how he had heard that Indians used to trap a single bee, keep it for a day or so, then let it go and follow it back to the hive so they could acquire the honey. I kept my tongue but couldn't imagine anyone attempting to track a single honey bee back to a hive! Anyway, to make a long story short, my new friend produced a mouse chewed roll of beautifully thick cotton cord which I purchased for $2.00

    Take Care!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Jonquière, Quebec (ABOVE 48th parallel North!!)
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    150

    Post

    Sorry for that kind of question, but I am french speaking and can't find what upholstry means. Can anyone explain it to me ?

    Thanks

    Hugo

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    12

    Post

    An upholstry shop is where people take their worn or used furniture to have new fabric coverings put on. Upholstry is another word for fabric that is used on furniture. I hope this helps.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Jonquière, Quebec (ABOVE 48th parallel North!!)
    Posts
    150

    Wink

    Thank you Amy, now I understand and finally know where to look for those cotton cords...

    Hugo

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    The Indians and other abroginal people do follow one bee back to the hive. They do it by catching the bee and using some honey or some glue to attach a piece of down (a small fluffy feather) to the bee so it can only fly quite slowly and can't get much altitude. It is also much easier to see. This they follow to the hive. But then an Apache or a Lakota always said they could outrun a horse, meaning they could out distance a horse. So running two miles behind a slow bee was easy work.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Marthasville MO
    Posts
    18

    Post

    I tried the fgmo applied to the cotton mop strands, the trouble I had is that the bees would pull the strands down between the frames. In pulling the strands back out there is the possibilty of injuring the queen, also many bees became hopelessly intangled in the cotton strands and died a rather needless death. I don't recommend the cotton mop for those reasons.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
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    The strands from a mop seemed to short to me, though I haven't measured their exact length. If you buy the upholstry cord you can measure exact 16" lengths and also be using the same thing Dr. Rodriguez recommends. That is really interesting about the bee tracking Michael... wow, I never would have imagined!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
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    553

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    Hello folks.
    I do not know where the 16 inch measurment comes from. I have always stressed the fact that cords should be 0ne meter long or in American standards, 40 inches.
    Cords should be laid on top of the frames in zig-zag fashion. This keeps the cords on top of the frames preventing them from falling in between the frames.
    I have mentioned here and elsewhere that the use of the cords has many funtions besides providing oil for the bees to put on themselves. Another plus, among many, is that the bees' hygienic behavior is stimulated making the bees knock-off mites from themselves when they "jump-start" their hygienic behavior because of the effet of FGMO on their legs.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Maine
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    Post

    I got the 16" measurement from the ABJ March 2003 article "More about FGMO for mite control" page 207. It says 8mm x 40 cm (5/16" x 16") cotton cords. I am sorry I mis-understood....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    Sorry about the confusion.
    My most swindere apologies.
    That was an unintentional error and I wrote correcting it.
    I suppose that it might haunt me for a long time. Sorry again.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    Sorry for the typos.
    that was supposed to say "my most sincere"
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Wow
    So much confusion .
    No need for that . If the cotton cords are drawn down between the frames , it is a possible sign the ingrediences have benn cleaned and the bees feel to remove foreign material off the hive ! It is advisable ,before this occurs ,to remove the cords and resaturate them again with the emulsion . That way , you safe the cords and possible avoid the removal instinct .
    The length of the individual cords is not so much of a criteria . As long as all cords end up in lenght with the recommendation of the specified one. For the person in St Joseph D'Alma :
    Instead of upholstrey cord you can utilize the Portion coton de Balai a laver (Faubert)
    He / she who is concerned pulling the cords between combs . , Make room by removing the outer com and move the rest over to gain space . You will mostlikely not do harm . Then put the frame/comb back at the same place from where it was removed .
    Happy emulsion doings

    JDF

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