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Thread: mite count

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I just slid the bottom boards in and fogged my bees. Then I checked the mite count the next day. Has anyone else done this? How does it compare to an ordinary 24hr drop? I've been fogging every week (no cords, after the 1st ones). My 16 hives go from none to too many to bother counting. Are there more mites just after fogging?

    Dickm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lynnville, Ia, USA
    Posts
    165

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    If the treatment works, there should be more after fogging. If you are getting high counts after application, the treatment may be working but if the high counts are random, then something else is causing it. A big cycle of brood with lots of mites may have emerged and caused the resulting mite fall.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

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    Hello folks.
    Please do not forget what I have spoken about several times here and elsewhere. This is a time of dearth of nectar ande also a time when weak dieing colonies (mostly due to severe varroa infedctions) will be robbed by healthy colonies and bring home big loads of mites. Of course, when you fog these mites are going to drop off and augment the number of your daily mite drop counts. This may not always be true but it will be reason for the majority of the times.
    What to do? Continue your treatments to get rid of those unwelcome visitorsand prevenbt them from multiplying in your colonies.
    Best regasrds.
    Hoping to see many of you in the Tampa area FLA, Friday August 9th.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Are you doing a 3 day average to get the 24 hour fall? Just counting what falls in one 24 hour period has been proven to be somewhat unrepresentative.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    This is actually the first time I checked so I have no comparison. I guess my question is: Is there an immediate effect from the fog or are the results achieved over time. If there is an immediate effect, then I may have an artificially high count on a few hives.

    Dickm

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    Regarding high mite counts.
    Please remember that I have mentioned several times to expect unusual high mite counts this part of the year even when you may have had low counts.
    Reason: marauding honey bees that come home from robbing mite-intested hives.
    Death from fogging is not instantaneous.
    Research has proven that mites have their spiracles open when feeding hence feeding (foretic) mites will be affected sooner with fog than those which are not feeding.
    FGMO acts in two ways: it blocks the spiracles of the mites causing them to suffocate, die from lack of oxygen, and making the surface of the host bees slippery and causing mites to fall off. I do not know of anyone who has determined how long it takes for varroa mites to deplete all their body oxygen and die. I am sure that some will do it sooner or later.
    For those who have read all my writings about varroa mites and FGMO, you should remember that my initial experiment involved observation of the behaviour of varroa mites under different conditions, one of them being while exposed to FGMO.
    Mites are hardy. Those of you who perform mite-drop counts from trays under meshed bottom boards should have noticed mites in several degrees of activity. Some dead, some moribund, and some very much alive. This is the reason for recommending the use of emulsion-soaked cords and stickly bottom trays to prevent mites from crawling back up on to the hive population.
    I know that this is repetitive for many of you but I hope you will forgive me for the benefit of readers who do not go beyond the recent posting and deprive themselves of the wealth of material that has been published previously.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

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