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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Lightbulb

    Burgess model 1443(propane version)
    Any one experiment with adding an extension
    onto the fogger allowing the fog to be blown
    deeper into the hive?

    ------------------
    Dave Verville
    Fremont, NH USA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Julian, NC, USA
    Posts
    252

    Post

    I dont believe that an extension is necessary to achieve the desired results. From all indications during my 1 1/2 years of use, the FGMO fog will permeate the entire hive under normal usage. If properly done, the fog rise throughout the hive and come out the cover. At least this has been my experience when using screened bottom boards and telecoping covers.
    I continue to have low mite counts and very little notice of deformed wings.
    Best regards,

    Kurt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    I will speak of someone else's experience (which I am about to try myself). This friend added a tube extension of 3 inches attached to the nozzle. The logic is not so much better reach into the hive but that the fog comes out cooled. In fact you can put your hand in front and not get burned (this I did try). Consequently you can put the tip closer to the hive without the risk of burning bees.
    The other attachment that may be useful is to attache a metal can (such as a tomato can) to the front of the fogger so that the combustion chamber sits now INSIDE the can. The idea is that a couple of inches or more of the very hot chamber where the gas is burning is somewhat covered. This decreases the heat radiated towards the front and so decreases the chances of ignition of oil fog bouncing back, and if there is a flame produced, it is shielded.

    These are things to experiment with a little but I think worth trying.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    This post is to announce that I will no longer contribute to this forum. Please address your mail to my private e-mail address.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,397

    Post

    > The logic is not so much better reach into
    > the hive but that the fog comes out cooled.

    This may be exactly what you don't want. Since heat rises, it may be important for the fog to be hot or warm for it to disperse properly throughout the hive. Cooled fog may tend to drop once released into the hive.

    -Barry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    All I know is it penetrates the hive fine as is. The fog has a lot of forward momentum and pemeated the hive without any real effort.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Barry,
    "Cooled fog may tend to drop once released into the hive."

    This is true, but then we could fog from the top through the upper enterance.

    BTW:I'm not trying to reinvent the wheel here. I am following Dr R's treatment to the letter. I'm just throwing out some thoughts that just may spawn some inovations.
    Guess I spent too many years as an engineer!


    ------------------
    Dave Verville
    Fremont, NH USA

    [This message has been edited by The Honey House (edited May 05, 2003).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    >Hello folks.
    >This post is to announce that I will no longer contribute to this forum. Please address your mail to my private e-mail address.
    >Best regards.
    >Dr. Rodriguez

    I take it this is not a good thing. I for one would like to say that I appreciate all of Dr. Rodriguez's contributions.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Ditto, Michael. Dr. R., if you are still reading, I appreciate your work as well.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    My heart felt thanks to all of you who trust FGMO well enough to try it on your bees. I just wish those who try would adhere to the procedures that have proven most effective during consecutive trials dating to 1994.
    There is nothing wrong with trying your own procedures however should you have less than desirable results, please do not blame FGMO or its form of application. FGMO continues to demonstrate its great potential as an alternate non-chemical method of treatment for honey bee mites.
    My most sincere thanks to all of you for your kind words of appreciation for my work.
    Best regards to all.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    I must apologize here about a previous posting that I think prompted Pedro R. to say that he was no longer going to post anything more here.
    I explained the logic of adding an extension to the fogger as being to reduce the temperature of the fog coming out at the end. Well, after failing to make this work at all (and instead, having built a remarkably reliable flame thrower), I checked with the friend who suggested it. He corrected me saying that his intension was purely to make the front end longer to be able to fog INTO the hive directly.

    So, today I can report that I took the **** thing off and have fogged beautifully from the rear of the SBB into the hive without any need of extension. The SBB is really what allows this to be done efficiently. The other advantage of the SBB is that one can fog from the other side of the bee's entrance and thus not stand in thir way while fogging. The fog kept coming out of the entrances and little gaps between boxes for at least 5-10 minutes. I think at 80-90% of the fog went into the hive if not more, and very little was blown into the wind for me to breath in.

    Sorry for the confusion.

    Jorge

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