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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Big Grin

    Hello folks.
    Barry, thank your for your kindness and fairness. There is no need for you to apologize. I realize that there will always be detractors in all walks of life. People who take sides just to satisfy their ego. As a moderator you have shown your mettle by being equitable and fair with all of us.
    I think that this BB is quite useful to apiculture hence it deserves to put aside personal ideologies in order that the potential of FGMO may continue to be shown.
    Speaking of FGMO potential, I wish to let all of you know that I will put into effect a modification in the use of FGMO against honey bee parasitic mites and Small Hive Bettles that promises to expand FGMO potential into unprecedented heights judging by initial observations. I will announce this new phase promptly as reportable data is available.
    I also wish to comment on two FGMO aspects
    hopefully putting aside controversial comments made recently:
    1. Micron size of the emissions of the Burgess Portable Propane Insect Fogger. I spoke with a high level officer at The Fountainhead Group, producers of this machine regarding this subject. I asked if laboratory tests had been performed to ascertain the size of the fog particles as described in the literature enclosed with the machine. The reply was yes, I told that he would consult with engineers of the company to provide specific information. He promised that he would get in contact with me as soon as he had that information.
    2. Ingredients of the chemical provided (sold) with the Burgess fogger. I was informed that the inert ingredients portion shown in the label of the chemical is: "ISO PAR FOOD GRADE MINERAL OIL."
    Disclaimer: Until 16 March 2003, when I received that information from Fountainhead, I did not know FGMO to be the petroleun distillate shown in the leabel of the chemical sold for insect control by Burgess. I began using FGMO with the Burgess Portable Propane Insect fogger based on my knowledge acquired as a veterinarian both in my private practice and during many years of government service. As far as I know, I am the only person ever to to propose the use of the Burgess Propane Insect Fogger to atomize FGMO for the treatment of honey bee mites. Also, prior to MY discovery that FGMO could be used for that specific purpose, I had no knowledge that mineral oil had been patented as an insecticide. That does not mean that it has not. What it means is that in research, there are possibilities of simultaneous independent utilization of chemicals without the parties involved having knowledge of that duality. The assertion that I have "copied" someone's accomplishments with the use of mineral oil is totally untrue and an unfair attempt at discrediting many years of hard unselfish work.
    My very best regards to all of you.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I think the fact that the inert ingredients in the normal insecticide used in the fogger is FMGO also asesses the issue of saftey. It is the main ingredient it was designed to fog.

    I again want to thank you for your work, Dr Rodriguez.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Big Grin

    Your are quite welcome, Mike. My pleasure.
    The Good Lord willing, looking forward to more and better things with FGMO this season.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Canyon Country, CA, US
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Page 1 of the Burgess Fogger manual states "The secret of fogging's success lies in its ability to reduce insecticide into microscopic particles averaging 15 microns in diameter..."
    I’m not sure from your post of what the Fountainhead Group (the distributers of the insecticide used in the Burgess Fogger) is accusing you. But unrelated to your post - I just read it and just got my Burgess fogger yesterday – Two weeks ago, I was on the phone for over two hours with Penreco in LA. They hold the patent on Drakol 35, and their mineral oil has not been approved as an insecticide, and they know of no other mineral oil that has been.
    However, Burgess labels their fogger insecticide with Resmethrin as the active ingredient, and Petroleum distillates 99.8% as an inert ingredient. I find it curious that anyone, other than the original patent holder, could claim a patent on the use of an inert ingredient in an insecticide; and, I would question whether anyone could claim a patent on mineral oil as an insecticide – especially for mites. Fountainhead would have to prove that they were the first to use mineral oil as an insecticide, and I don't believe they could do that. But even if they could, their patent would have expired long ago, since mineral oil has been used as a folk remedy for ear mites for as long as it has been used as a laxative. I was personally using mineral oil to treat ear mites on my lions as early as 1965, and wrote a letter to Dr. Richard Ott, head of Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine about it that year. And my father used mineral oil to treat ear mites on his hound before I was born in 1937. This was in liquid (and gel form) but nevertheless it was used as an insecticide. As for its use in a fogger, neither Burgess nor Fountainhead licenses their fogger, they sell their froducts outright. So the buyer is free to use it however he sees fit, being subject only to violations of law. Nor was Burgess the first to use mineral oil in foggers. The movie industry, and still photographers have used foggers to create a dry mist using mineral oil since at least the 1920s.
    If Fountainhead tries to raise an issue with the use of mineral oil as an insecticide, let me know.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Of course if mineral oil really was an incecticide it would kill bees. It is, however a mitecide, but not from any chemical activity, merely because it clogs their tiny orifices. I found a long time ago the best thing for lice is not a chemically active poison but oil. Olive is prefered because it smells ok and washes off better than FMGO. But FMGO works fine in lice too. But no one is selling oil for killing lice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    I have never said that I was being "accused" of anything. I apologize if I have mislead the readers in this forum. I was merely commenting on the fact that some detractors give the impression that I copied the use of FGMO. I have made it clear from the very beginning that I had adapted the use of FGMO for HONEY BEE MITES control based on my experience as a veterinarian, University of Pennsylvania, Class of 62, quite a few years ago and as a federal veterinary supervisor of oeperations in industrial complexes utilizing FGMO.
    Again, I do take pride in having originated the use of FGMO as a miticide for honey bee mites. NOT because I expect to ever derive any financial benefits from it but because I think there is a place for FGMO in apiculture and because FGMO offers an alternative to chemical pesticides which have the difficulty of ending in the honey as contaminants, chemical pesticides are pricey and ultimately end up being useless because mites develop resistance to them in a short period of time. FGMO properly used is a cost-effective miticide, nature friendly and quite economic, and, one that can be guaranteed not to ever develop resistance by mites.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Canyon Country, CA, US
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Kudos, Dr. Rodriguez. FGMO as an insecticide was a misnomer. Technically, I used it to control mites and then a combination of rotenone and FGMO to kill them. Not only do you deserve credit for being the first to use FGMO fog to control mites, but also you deserve our praise and admiration.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Thank you WT, and all of you who trust your bees to FGMO. Your kind words are greatly appreciated.
    Best wishes with your work this season and many more to come.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

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