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Thread: Cotton cord

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Brasstown, NC , USA
    Posts
    31

    Question

    Hey everyone
    Iwent in search of welt cord and found an upholsterer (sp) who was willing to sell it to me for 25 cents a yard. Being cheap I went looking for the tobacco twine mentioned a while back. The gentleman at the hardwareuse to raise tobacco but does not remember a special cord to tie it. While there I told him I needed cotton cord about the size of a pencil. He showed me what he claims to be cotton rope which was 1/2 inch in diameter and made up of 3 exactly perfect strands. The cost is 15 cents a foot which is significantly cheaper than the welt. My problem is this ! How can I be sure that it is cotton. Does anyone know an easy way to tell?? I tried burning it and it does not melt like a nylon or rayon. Could use some advise.

    Thanx
    Mike Garitta

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello everyone.
    Hi Mike.
    I appreciate your comments regarding cotton cordage.
    Your math might be slghtly off unless you are thinking about it the same way that I am.
    Cordage at 15 cents a foot equals 45 cents a yard vs. 25 cents a yard for welt cord.
    However, if I read thiks right, you say that the rope they offered you is 1/2 inch wide and has three strands, you should be able to get three workable strands out of each yard of material. If so, then you are going to obtain cordage at 15 cents a yard. That is very reasonable.
    My ongoing test for materials to ascertain if they are cotton is burning. Cotton definitely burns differently from synthetic cords. Plastic material ignites readily and burns faster, smells like petroleum, and melts like tar. (That's my closest way to describe it, but I guess that it might be pretty accurate in common terms).
    Should you go for this type of cordage, please make sure that you tie the ends of your sections of cord and to remove them at least every two weeks to prevent the bees from propolizing them. Then your cost of cordage is going to go down progressively as you continue to re-use the cords. Simple economic facts.
    Good luck to all of you and please let us know what your observations are. We need feed back from all of you out there in "beelands."
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    Can you use an old style mop replacement, and cut to length? Never tried it, but the thought crossed my mind.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Brasstown, NC , USA
    Posts
    31

    Cool

    Yes Dr R
    You read me correctly. By unwrapping the rope I get 1 yard of cotton cord from 1 foot of rope. I am no math wiz but I am frugal. I did burn a small piece and it burned readily but with no petroleum odor or melting. When I blew out the flame the rope continues to smoke and burn as a wick would. Thanx for your response. Would like to meet you some day and perhaps have in to give the Mountain Bee Assoc. a little talk on your project. You sound like an interesting man.

    Thanx
    MIke Garitta

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    617

    Post

    Mike, I bought a string mop at the local Dollar store, take the mop off the handle and use the strings. Dale

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    I am addressing three posts in one because all three refer to same subject: cords.
    a. Yes, indeed. I have said in several posts before that mop cords may be an excellent substitute provided they the standard cotton type mops. Just make sure tha you do have the equivalent length in cords. Do not cut yourself short of length because your will be depriving the bees of the quantity of FGMO that has been proven to work best during the past years' of trials.
    b. Yes, the emulsion soasked cords are complementary to the fogger. They should be utilized because of the following reasoning. When the fog is applied, it affects only those bees that become in contact with the fog. Foraging bees and bees that are born after the fog is applied remain FGMO free. Nurse bees, those most recently born, are carriers of Varroa mites. They more than the rest are in need to become exposed to FGMO in order for those female mites they are "carrying piggy-back" become exposed to FGMO and either die or fall before returning to the cells to lay their eggs. Foraging bees that have not been exposed to the fog may come home bearing mites from hives that they have robbed and need to come in contact with FGMO for the same reasons as do the nurse bees, to have those mites affected by FGMO and keep them from migrating to the brood cells. It is just a matter of logistics, my friends. The more sources of FGMO that you have for your bees to come in contact with, the better are the chances of mite removal before they do their damage.
    c. And last but not least, Mike Garitta.
    Thanks for your kind words, brother Mike. Yes, it would be a great pleasure and an honor to share some time with you and your bee club members. Just make the arrangements and let me know ahead of time for me to arrange my schedule.
    d. The same gratitude is extended to al of you who share my enthusiasm and are willing to try FGMO on your bees. The bees, mother nature and humanity will thank you too. All of us will be better off when we have total control of our bee parasites and are able to enjoy a toxic-free environment.
    My very best to all of you.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Greetings to all of you
    I just read today's posts and needless to say Dr R has explained well.
    In the past we have pointed out where a good supply of cotton cord is available . One of the members pointed this out over year ago.
    Go to Cost Co ( If you have one nearby) and buy the REPLACEMENT wet mops for standard mop handles . You will find thgem for a very reasonable price either two or three mops in the bundle . Cut the flat Center tie - in stitches and you have cords of the right length . They work well and can be resaturated . The color is grayish and if you think they should be cleaned , then just wash them first.
    The next item is the mechanics or dynamics of mite propagation. At least Part of it.
    I must assume that you all know the odds and ends of mite reproduction and its formative stages within the cell.
    Once they are on their way , they will looking for other places to propagate for survival. If they are too many within the colony they have to spend some time riding the bees until something suitable comes along to begin their journy to another colony. Now , I cannot tell you what motivates them to prefer drones for the outside ride . I simply do not know .
    But we can speculate and apply knowledge gathered by researchers .
    Mite have no eyes but have sensing organs ( The first two front "Legs") telling them Infrared vibes and specific pheromones .
    They appear to prefer pheromones ( Body odor ) from nurse bees and brood cells .( DRONE CELLS preferred ) May be even the brood itself .
    This has been tested and proven by research.
    They are not interested in field bees as much as anything else .
    BUT ,what about drones ?
    We know that drones are readily welcome in any colony and are therefore mingling with the occupation of the hive . And those are more likely to transport the mite than field bees , UNLESS ,as stated , the did or do some robbing in a weak colony full of mites eager to leave the premises as the rats of a sinking ship.
    That they do hitch rides on workerbees is a fact . I have seen one hanging on one of the hind-legs of a worker just outside the entry of the hive .
    Considering those behaviors it is understandable the benefit of SBB's since the ATTRACTANTS are simply not there making a return path for the dropped mite quite difficult or nonexsitent .
    So it gives the notion that wandering drones are most likly the culprit of mite transport and there is nothing we can do about it .
    I am reluctant to apply drone cell elimination . Drones may have purpose in bee land other than just mating. And since you cannot have any influence outside your apiary for drone cultivation , you will be hard pressed to gain the upper hand in this scenario.
    I wonder whether anyone did some research in typical "Drone Yards".
    Here again it shows how ignorant we are , although we know a lot more today than yesterday.
    We are having exceptional mild weather now and the bees survived nicely in hives where the colony had plenty stores . ( One died because they were too lazy to store food . Too bad , rough rough .
    Today I even saw a worker bringing in pollen . just amazing.
    I hope they survive the next two months and will be monitoring daily drop off as I am physically able to do so.
    Best wishes to all of you .
    JDF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    Hi,

    I had a long drive late at night today and started thinking about the cotton cords. I stated thinking that the cords or putting beads or painting FGMO on the top bars makes little sense unless I am mising something essential. The fogging methods makes sense to me because the bees are entirely "showered" in oil, and thus the mites get it no matter where on the bee they may be found. However, painting oil on the top bars or using the cords will get it only on the bee's feet. How effective can this be? Only if the bees do extensive grooming right after they walk over the stuff. I have seen the bees gnawing at the cords. For the same reason as above, how can this help?

    Jorge

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,329

    Post

    But they groom with their feet. The cords cause them to rub against it more than just their feet though. I have not used the cords, but when you put the FGMO on the top bars, which I have done, you can see them get it on their feet and groom with their feet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    I keep asking people to read my previous posts on FGMO, which by now have become quite a lot. (And perhaps, this is a problem; people do not want to spend time digging for the answer to their specific question or suggestion). Be it as it may, the point in question at this time is that I have explained more than once why the fog and emulsion soaked cords are complementary. Here it is again.
    1. There is no doubt that mite-infested hives give off new generations of mites every day.
    2. When fogging is done, ONLY the bees that are present in the hive at the moment are exposed to FGMO. Unborn bees and those that are foraging are not exposed to FGMO fog and hence do not get that protective shield/film of oil on their bodies.
    3. For those bees that are not exposed to FGMO, another form of application of FGMO must be provided so that they can get exposed to it and in so doing, the mites traveling piggy-back on them can get exposed and doop-off before they return to the cells to lay their eggs on developing larvae.
    4. Please remember that I have demonstrated that foraging bees, especially those that are robbing their sick neighbors bring home large numbers of mites, pregnant female mites that is! Some of these mites will not come in contact with FGMO if the only source of FGMO is that applied via fogging. And, of course, the number of bees that have not been exposed to FGMO fogging will depend on how often beekeepers apply FGMO "fog" to their hives.
    5. I have attempted to time the interval between the time emulsion soaked cords are placed on the top bars and the time it takes for the bees to start visiting them, and the result is INMEDIATELY. No time lapse.
    6. When the bees "feed" (and that is the reason for honey or sugar to be added to the emulsion, the bees get their feet and under belly exposed to FGMO. Bees are finicky about their grooming. The moment that they notice something foreign is sticking to their body, they start grooming. End result? FGMO is evenly distributed over their bodies. Bees will walk on FGMO spread over the top bars. I know that fact because I studied that as one of my original experiemnts. Their response to that experiment was not as speedy as I wished it to be hence my next step was to add sugar to the emulsion. The emulsion turned out to be expensive to manufacture and soon I could not afford it. From sugar I progressed to honey. And why not? Honey is a hive product and very suitable for the purpose. My bonus in this stage was the readiness with which the bees went for the emulsion and the fact that using beeswax not only did I add another hive product to the medication, but I managed to prepare an FGMO true emulsion with home equipment and at very economic costs.
    Please belive me, I have had the same doubs that most beekeepers may have. The difference is that I have taken the time and effort to take them out to the field, tested them, and found out which worked the best. I am satisfied that the methodology in use at present produces the best results. But do not fret, I am continuing to look for more efficient, cost-effective methods to apply FGMO. I will post my results promptly regardless of what they are.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Juandefuca
    Greetings to all
    Dr Rodriguez again laid out the specifics of this research and explained in detail what his observations were .
    I have nothing to contribute to this than the climatic differences in various areas of the world
    The following was seen in latitudes of colder climates .
    It is without any debate that the emulsion and the application of the emulsion does work as described .
    But one has to consider the location of the cords at the same time
    I lay the cords in snake fashion on top of the frames , and not only one but 3 or 4 . The reason for it is , the bees take a longer time to "consume " the emmulsion , hereby lenghten the time of application .When all emulsion is "consumed "and the cords are still in good shape . Keeping the cords beyond that is waste of time for the bees and your financial situation.
    I cannot quote findings in warmer climates .
    But I observed that from December to possibly February, Depending on the weather temperature ,the cluster is located on the combs . They , the bees , are not apt to leave this location when the temperature is not to their liking , even to gather food nearby. I have lost colonies due to this .
    The appear to ignore the cords on top during this time indicating the movement is little , if at all. The indication for this the emulsion has not been toched since last applied . This never occurs during warmer weather or when the bees start moving around .
    This in turn maesn that the only appliction of not is the fogging . The fogging in turn should be applied frequently to expose the outer layer of the bees of the cluster .
    The outer layer as it has been documented elsewhere rotates ( I hope That that IS the case , relying on research ) , thus bringing non exposed bees to the surface of the cluster to be again fogged at the next fogging round .
    It means that it is important to continue fogging during the "Dormant" time of the year causing possible phoretic mites to suffocate.
    My observation during the late fall early winter was a remaceble increase in dead mites accumulating on the check board beneath the screen
    Happy beeing
    JDF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Ballina, C. Mayo, Ireland
    Posts
    4

    Post

    Hiya
    being new to this website, I have read a lot of topics and am finding it interesting. one thing about cotton cords that I feel I should make a comment on is this: I believe growing cotton is one of the dirtiest crops grown, with heavy dependency on herbacides and insecticides and wonder if any of this can be detected in the "cords" or even in the clothes we wear? Is anyone up to speed on this subject? Jon

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    OKlahoma
    Posts
    1

    Post

    hi all
    I am confused about the cotton cord length to use in the emulsion. I read in a article where Dr. Pedro Rodriguez said, a length of 40 cm (16"). Here everybody says, a length of 500mm (39"). Which one is right or does the length matter that much? Any help will be appreciated. Thank you.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hello folks.
    I sit in shame in front of my PC screen. I have read the January 2003 ABJ article at least 10 times and never noticed that I had made an error of considerable dimensions. I knew that sooner or later my juggling of the metric system back and forth with my measurements in the States was going to get me in trouble. Well, like I say, I did. Reading today's posts on this forum I realized it. I went back and reviewed my article on ABJ and sure enough I wrote 40 cm when in fact, I was thinking of 40 inches, which is close to the European measures that I use, 1 meter. I would have loved for someone to have written to me to point out this error before it went on as long as it has. Thankfully, the season is not too far started and not much damaged has been done, except to my pride. I sincerely apologize for the blunder and shall write a memo to the Editor, (ABJ) about the error. Please be advised that my trials have been performed using one meter length cords, or 40 inches if you use USA measurements.
    Again, my most sincere apologies and best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

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