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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Can one use sugar syrup in place of honey in the mix? What proportions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
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    553

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    Hi.
    Yes.
    When I first started using the emulsion, I used sugar. The original formula was publisehd here on Beesource.com and should be easily located in the archives. (I have just returned from a three week trip and have "tons" of mail to answer, please excuse me for not having time to search for it).
    I went on to use honey because, it is a natural beehive product, because the bees are readily attracted to it, and because it became more expensive to use sugar than it was to use honey.
    I do not know what your reasons would be for not wanting to utilize a procedure that has been proven to be more economic and more efficient, but, surely, yes, you could use sugar syrup if you so wished.
    Best regards.
    Dr. Rodriguez

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Thanks for the reply. I wanted to use sugar because I have some new pristine hives and I would have to buy the honey. That would add another variable as I've read that honey can contain all sorts of things including AFB. I've ordered the pump and oil.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
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    553

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    Hi.
    I understand your reasoning and admire your trend of thought.
    Think that you do not have to fear AFB in the emulsion because all you have to do is to allow the solution to come to a boil. That will kill the spores in the solution should there be any. Honey really makes a difference as far as the bees are concerned. It is the "hook" that is needed for them to go for it right away.
    Good luck and please write again should you still have questions.
    Pedro

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Thanks for your time.I never thought about the temperature killing afb. My fogger came in today and is still unopened. I bought some unscented mineral oil from the hardware store where I bought the fogger. (When it is used on a butcher block surface, they put scent in it.)(Ace Hardware) I found some all-cotton mop replacements at Costco. They were made by O'Cedar and were for commercial use. That will do for the cord. I too have open screens on the bottom. Use the same 5 seconds? I'm still going with sugar. Will mix 2 to 1 and assume it's like honey. Stubborn, no?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

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    Hi.
    I don't think that you are sttuborn at all.
    I like persistency/consistency relating to ibe's work habits. Stick with the sugar and watch your results. I would like to suggest that you doprepare one batch with noney and one with sugar and kind of keep tabs on cost and on your results (watch to see which one the bees prefer, if there is a preference).
    In any event, please do let me know if you have more questions.
    My very best to you and other beekeepers.
    Pedro

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    1,966

    Post

    I fogged my 8 hives yesterday. I ended up paying $5.00 for a quart of honey and using it in the emulsion. Am I to understand that 3 items are used? 1. fog; 2. strands soaked in emulsion; and 3. FMGO dribbled on the frame tops. I did all that.
    I ended up using strands from an all cotton commercial mop made by O'Cedar. I can't help but wonder about the need for the wax (as I scrub out my pot.) The cord looks like a lot for them to carry out. I'll look for some paper cord. When in the season do you stop this. I'm in Ct.(USA)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
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    553

    Post

    Hi Dick and all.
    Good for you.
    There is no need to "dribble FGMO on the top bars any longer." that was one of my initial forms of application. I have gone on to better forms of application, namely, emulsion/cords and fogger.
    If the bees do not propolize or destroy the cords, yo may soak them and use again. I have done that and it works okay. My original cords were paper lined and the bees would destroy the entire cords and "blow" them out of the hive. I now use strictly cotton cords that remain whole for a long time and I re-use them. No problem.
    In Ct. you should be able to fog and lay the emulsion soaked cords until just before the first freeze, then wait for Spring.
    Happy beekeeping. Please keep us informed of your findings.
    Pedro

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Post

    I saw a remarkable thing today. A bee was trying to move what looked like a piece of fluff out of the hive, at the entrance. As I looked closer I saw that it was more than fluff and I thought it was a bit of wax moth webbing. I thought I'd give the girl a little help and moved the bit with my hive tool. It was only then that I realized that that poor bee was struggling to drag the entire cord (emulsion soaked) of cotton that I'd placed on top of the frames. How it got that far I don't know ... but it was headed out of the hive. Go figure!

    What is the reason for the wax in the emulsion?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA and Alcala, Spain
    Posts
    553

    Post

    Hi.
    Emulsification of mineral oil can be an expensive laboratory procedure.
    Utilization of beeswax makes it possible to be home made at pennies per batch. That has been one of my most lucky brakes during this entire saga with FGMO.
    Dr Rodriguez

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