As promised, here are some questions asked about FGMO and my answers.
Question.
Like all scientific endeavors, one answer spurs many new questions. Here are some. Is FGMO any different from mineral oil used as a laxative? USP mineral oil will be purer than food grade and certainly safe for ingestion. But then mineral oil is a class of oils with different physical characteristics.
Answer.
Drakeol 35, is USP mineral oil. Besides being food grade, Drakeol 35's viscosity is very important, or else it will not work. Among other things, if the wrong kind of mineral oil is used, for example, high viscosity mineral oil may result in death of queens!
Question.
Waht do bees do with the Welt upholstery cord that they eat?
Answerr.
The Welt cord is not eaten as such. It is chewed and removed from the hive. The sugar in the emulsion is there to give the bees an incentive to chew. And they do chew.
Question.
Is it really ingested and then excreted? Same would be true for newspaper used to temporally separate brood chambers.
Answeer.
Yes. Bees chew newsppaer to a fine dust and remove it from the hive. Most of the time the paper dust is blown out of the hive by air currents created by the bees for ventilation.
I hoped that bees would act on the Welt cord as they do with newspaper, and they did.
Question.
Would the bees electively take up an oil/sugar solution delivered in a top feeder rather than a sugar/water solution?
Answer.
Yes. Bees go for an oil/sugar solution (emulsion). A year ago I used patties made up with FGMO oil/sugar emulsion and the bees were observed working on it. I prefer the Welt cord because it is easier and more economic for handling. I am using nothing but the cord this year for wintering. It remains to be seen how effective it will be.
Question.
Is there any reason to believe that ingesting oil from any means is deleterious to a bees gut?
Answer.
I have not observed any deleterious effect when using FGMO during the past 4 plus years of trials. Besides, there isn't much oil for them to ingest. The amounts (that they obviously must ingest) have not shown any adverse effect on the bees, larvae or queens.
Question.
Have you done tracheal dissection to look at the impact of FGMO fog on tracheal mites?
Answer.
Yes. I have not seen one single tracheal mite since I have been using FGMO. This fact has been corroborated by a beekeeper in the Canary Islands (Spain) where tracheal mites are endemic, who has been using FGMO for at least two years. He states, "I have never seen cleaner trachea in my bees." Incidentally, the beauty of of FGMO "fog" is that the fog is inhaled by the bees, thus acting on the mites within the trachea.
Question.
Do you make any effort to reduce the oil exposure while supers are on?
Answer.
Not at all. And oil has not been noted to get into the honey, yet.
Question.
Your observations are so compelling as an easy fix to a bad problem. Has there been any atempt to duplicate your studies thus verifying your results so that large scale application could be implemented?
Answer.
I believe that one of the reasons why use of FGMO has not "taken off" is that it is too
simple to be true. I trust that as time goes on, that there will be more beekeepers who will try the method.
I know of at least one person who has tried
He was not able to duplicate my work (last year). I believe that his failure was due to the fact that he used mineral oil with high viscosity. I suggested to him that he should try Drakeol 35, but I have not heard from him again.
Dr. Rodriguez