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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Question

    I recieved my monthly Arbor Day mailing for January 2007 a couple days ago. The featured plant was the hazelnut, with some stories from growers and tidbits of information regardling benefits. It kind of peaked my interest.

    Does anyone grow hazelnuts? Any comments or experiences would be welcome.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    I've got about 15 hazelnuts that I planted on my property about 10-12 years ago. I originally started with 10 that I bought from one of the plant suppliers (I think that it was Gurney's).

    Hazelnuts can be pruned to grow as a single small tree (about 15-20 feet high) or as a multi-stemmed shrub. After mine had grown for about 3 or 4 years as small trees, I let some of the root produced sprouts grow large enough for me to seperate them from the orignal trees and transplant them as new plants. Out of the 10 original plants 9 of them survived and all five of my transplants also survived.

    The plants that I pruned to remain as single trunked trees definitely produce fewer nuts than the ones that I allowed to spread out and grow as multi-stemmed shrubs. At this point in time the 8-9 year old shrubs are all much shorter (7-8 feet tall) than the ones that I have pruned as tress (15-20 feet tall). The shrubs continue to spread as each year they send out new sprouts from their ever expanding root system. Some of the shrubs are now 3-4 feet in diameter at the base and 8-10 feet wide at their widest point.

    I don't know if my soil, climate or variety is to blame but the nuts I get off of my hazelnuts are really too small to be of much value. Most years they are about half the size of the nuts that you can buy in the store and other years they are even smaller than that! Maybe every third year or so I'll get nuts that are actually worth picking and eating.

    The japanese beetles love the leaves and it is necessary to watch out for them and spray for them when the beetles are in the area. I've also had trouble with whitetail deer bucks. They REALLY like to rub their antlers on them when they need to get the velvet off. Each year their are numerous branches broken and rubbed barkless by the deer in my yard. They do however make for a good ambush location when the shrubs still have leaves on them in the early archery season. The other pest in my area associated with hazelnuts are the squirrels. If you want any nuts off of the trees you must stake a claim and somehow keep the critters away. My reccomendation is a 12 ga. with #6 shot (I got 14 of the little buggers in 3 days.)

    [size="1"][ January 02, 2007, 01:53 PM: Message edited by: carbide ][/size]
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Thanks carbide,

    I have found several interesting sites. This one is for Australia, and is dated a few years, but seem complete.

    http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/reader/d...production.htm

    Sorry to hear about your small nuts. Do you think its from a lack of nutrition, pruning or too much plant developement?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    265

    Post

    We have hazelnuts growing wild up here. They are found on shrubs that get about head high. Squirrels just love them and I think thats how most of them get seeded. They grow in under a tree canopy, here and make great browse for moose. Each shrub will have a few nuts but about the time they start to rippen, they are harvested by chipmunks and squirrels.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,233

    Post

    Bjorn,

    Forget most of what you have read about hazelnuts. Forget also about most of the commercial seedlings that are commonly available.

    Here are some good links on Hazelnuts:

    http://www.icserv.com/nnga/index.html go to the resources list and then click on hazelnut.
    http://www.badgersett.com/ One of the better sources of trees.

    Read the articles on hazelnut at Oregon State University but keep in mind that they are directed toward commercial growers. Read the info at Badgersett to get a good idea of growing hazelnuts in your yard. Don't plant a hazelnut unless it is resistant to Eastern Filbert Blight!

    Darrel Jones

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Thanks fusion. I'll print the sites out.

    Makes me wish I would held off making that purchase through the Arbor Day Society. Now I questions.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    BjornBee,

    I think my problem with the bushes producing small hazelnuts is probably a result of the poor soil here. I typically have about 6-8 inches of poor, overused, undertreated topsoil. When I bought this place I didn't know that the previous owner had farmed here forever without spending much on soil improvement over the years. After I moved in I had the soil analyzed and discovered that it would require the total annual budget of IBM or GE to get the soil back into good fertile condidion again. Anyway, below the topsoil is some of the nicest clay that you ever laid your eyes on. That is if you wanted to make pottery or old fashioned marbles.

    Even though the nuts are typically small the squirrel don't seem to have a problem enjoying them.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    eastern Hanover, Virginia
    Posts
    361

    Post

    i read that hazelnut trees make a good host tree for truffles. you can buy saplings already innoculated with the truffles for about $25 or so. They're sold for the truffle harvest more than the hazelnuts, so i don't know if you could get the exact hazelnut variety that you wanted. But it could be nice to know if the nuts don't pan out, you can always dig up some gourmet truffles instead.
    -M@

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    Due to the above normal temperatures that we've had during the last month some of the male catkins on my hazelnuts have been blooming. I expect that some of my trees will not have any nuts on them this coming spring. It's finally turned colder (down to about 15F last night) and I imagine that has put an end to the blooming for now.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

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