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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Lyons, CO
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    Can anyone recommend an online source for a reasonably durable, accurate balance scale (like a three-beam type)? I'm looking to maybe spend a little over a hundred bucks... reasonable? It'd be for weighing minerals, hops, oxalic acid, etc. I have an aged digital kitchen-type scale, but it's not very accurate even with fresh batteries and I'd trust a balance more. Just too anal to guess, I guess [img]smile.gif[/img] .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
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    5,080

    Post

    Any firearm reloading store, or the same online. About 20 bucks, and very acurate.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    A reloading scale is accurate to 1/10 of a grain.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Or go to your neighborhood "Head" shop. They have very nice scales for measuring "tobacco" products.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    How risky is a used scale? If it zeros, will it be accurate? Or could problems lurk unseen? And what's a grain, weightwise? I'd like to be able to go up to a couple pounds or so...
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Triple beams are very reliable and easy to calibrate with known weight. Some come with calibration weights.

    One ounce equals 437.5 grains in Troy weight.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    Nice tip Sundance, there's a ton of them. Thanks!
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    7000 grains to a pound. Avp. not Troy.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    avoirdupois, troy, grains, pounds, stone -- what a mess. I'll stay metric and stick with grams.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Metric sure looks good when you survey all the wacko weights and measurements.....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I think we should all measure velocity in furlongs per fortnight. [img]smile.gif[/img] And instead of acres and square feet, well just standardize on hides. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Seriously, though, all the reloading manuals I own are ONLY in grains, so metric does not do me any good. Not to mention all the reloading SCALES are only in grains. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    But how did they come up with 7000 grains to a pound? You'd expect some nice binary number like 2, 4, 8, 16 etc. It seems natural to divide something in half and half again. While dividing something into ten parts works out well (only because we are in base ten), it isn't the easiest thing to eyeball. But 7000? It does seem strange.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

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    <<I think we should all measure velocity in furlongs per fortnight. >>

    Michael, did you happen to read a book titled "The Know-it-All" lately? Good read!

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/074...lance&n=283155

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Is that a hint? No I've never read it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > But how did they come up with 7000 grains
    > to a pound?

    The name of the unit of measure itself is the
    reason.

    A grain was weight of a single grain of barley.
    At some point after that, they switched to using
    grains of wheat, forcing everyone to agree that
    3 barley grains equaled 4 wheat grains.

    None of the above had anything to do with
    the "pound" at all, hence the weird conversion.

    I have no idea which grain the current grain
    is based upon, as I like grams much better.
    And before anyone asks, the gains of whole
    wheat that go into gram crackers have nothing
    to do with the unit of measure "gram". [img]smile.gif[/img]

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Jim......... that one actually hurt.....

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
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    >gram crackers

    As opposed to Graham crackers?

    Back when I was a surveyor, I encountered many different units of length measurement. The strangest I heard about but never saw in a deed was a "smoke" which was defined as the distance you'd cover in the time it took to smoke a cigarrete whilst riding on a horse. The most common unit of measurement from "the old days" was the rod, perch, or pole all equal to 16.5 feet. There are 320 rods to the mile and 160 square rods per acre. Makes a certain amount of sense. "Chains" were popular, they were 66' long which coincidentally is 4 rods. Chains were occassionally divided into links, or 1/100th of a chain, or 0.66'. Of course folks also used paces and strides (approximately 3' and 6' respectively).

    I have personally encountered "a fur piece" which I eventually figured out was about 1/2 a mile. It was used as in "Thence a fur piece along land of <so-and-so> to a pile of stones".
    Dulcius ex asperis

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
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    6,507

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    The strangest I heard about but never saw in a deed was a "smoke" which was defined as the distance you'd cover in the time it took to smoke a cigarrete whilst riding on a horse.
    You knew this was coming.....

    Seems like the two variables, the horse and smoking material, would lend more than a bit of imprecision to this unit of measure.
    A fat guy on a Shetland pony would tend to cover a relatively short distance. A lanky young country boy on a Tennessee Walker would cover a really long distance. Lady Godiva on a white stallion wouldn't cover anything. Some of the leftovers from the 60's would finish the cigarette and promptly fall off the horse.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

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    >You knew this was coming.....

    Saw it coming from 320 rods away..

    >Seems like the two variables, the horse and smoking material, would lend more than a bit of imprecision to this unit of measure.

    Clealy. I recall this was a citation from a deed from somewhere in the southwest. I don't know if the measure included rolling a cigarette, or just smoking it, but the horse was walking.

    >Lady Godiva on a white stallion wouldn't cover anything.

    Can't see her smoking either..
    Dulcius ex asperis

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

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    "A grain was weight of a single grain of barley"

    I found an old reference that said the grain had to be from the center of the barley head. I guess they didn't worry if it had been a dry year or not.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

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