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Thread: Trees in Pots?

  1. #1
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    I was given some American Chestnut trees. They were bare-root but someone potted them before they came to me. I won't be anywhere near the family farm for another few weeks. And even then, no one will be able to water them.

    They've already started leafing out.

    I contacted the association who raised them, and the lady nearly came through the computer to strangle me for having them in pots. I share her concern, BUT I have to be realistic. I can't plant them yet.

    Anyone have guidance over getting them through the growing season in pots?

    I figure that next fall after they've gone dormant would be the best time to plant so I won't have to water them. Hopefully, then by string, they'll be settled in. Other option is to plant them late May and let nature take it's course.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  2. #2
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    For best root development it is preferable to plant bareroot trees directly in the ground. However, in pots with deepish saucers you can certainly go a few days or so at a time without watering them. Deep saucers tend to rot the potting mix however. Another thing to keep them from drying out too fast is to keep them in a fairly shaded location, as young trees for one season that's not too bad.

  3. #3
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    Put the pots in the ground or at least cover them with mulch; it'll help keep them cool and slow evaporative losses. Maybe bring the trees to someone who can water them. Underwatering (with the saucer) has worked for me.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  4. #4
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    Trees are potted from bare root every single day by nurseries!!

    It is certainly optimal to get them in the ground from bareroot. But potting will be fine. Just slows them a bit.

    As Ben says, keep em' wet and cool.

  5. #5
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    I started a buch of different trees in pots once, and they all ended up rooting in the ground. The pots made it a real pain to transplant. Can you put them in the ground now, without pots, then transplant to the farm in winter or early spring?

  6. #6
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    You did not state how deep the pots are or how tall the trees are. If the pot is too shallow it will curl around and be root bound, nut trees have a tap root that should grow straight down.
    I started a dozen American Chestnuts from a tree in Akron Ohio--the tree has been removed so I just got the nuts in time about four years ago. Still have about half a dozen of the trees left, it is hard to protect them from deer and rabbits.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  7. #7
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    The trees are 1-2 feet tall. Right now they are in 1 gallon "slips" pots. I have larger pots, but read that one can give a plant Too much pot. The tap root is definately a concern, but these came with the tap root already cut.

    Thanks
    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  8. #8
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    I'd be concerned about doing this too long.

    If this is going to be a month or more then it might be better planting them and re-digging in the late fall when ready to plant.

  9. #9
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    Jeez, one-gallon pots? Bring them with you or inside. If it's only for a few weeks it'll be easy to harden them off again on the farm and plant them.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  10. #10
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    I've got bigger pots. They are in my living room and the weather is right for growing things outdoors, but perhaps they'll progress a little slower inside. I live in a national park, so planting anything and digging it up is out of the question. I guess my only option is to plant them in the 3 gallon pots and then replant in Alabama in May. I'm sure I'll loose them that way since by then it will be HOT and getting DRY. But sounds like no one has any advice on how to manage them in pots at all.

    The guest speakers did tell us that we could trim the tap root but not the feeder roots. Go figure that one out. It sounds contrary to Everything I've heard before.

    Thanks, Waya
    WayaCoyote

  11. #11
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    If you get them in larger 3 or 5 gallon pots and water well they will to fine. 1 gallon won't cut is longer term.

    I wintered 20 fruit trees in 3 gallon pots just fine.

    [size="1"][ April 07, 2006, 10:21 PM: Message edited by: Sundance ][/size]

  12. #12
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    Now, there's something I Can work with. I have the pots and the soil and the time to repot them. I only can not plant them.

    Thanks
    waya
    WayaCoyote

  13. #13
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    Mar 2006
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    Pflugerville Texas
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    I just happen to own a nursery, and we just happen to grow trees in pots. We take them all the way up to 65Gal, and have no problems doing so. My advice would be to put them into the 5 gal pots, and partially bury them into the ground. Put them in your garden, flowerbed, or wherevery you can easily water them. How many holes does the pot have in it? If it has a center hole, tape it up with duct tape so no roots can come through it. Mark the top of the pot with something to show you where the holes on the bottom sides are. This will make it easier to prune some of the roots in the early fall. When fall rains come and it begins to cool down(not cold) just dig down to half the holes, and prune any roots coming out causing these to regenerate more, most of which will be inside the pot. Once the trees have started to color or lost their leaves dig out the pot, and plant them where you want them, giving them all winter to root out and get established before the next summer.
    That being said, all of our trees a grown in pots on top of the ground, although we have to water them 1 to 3 times per day with an automatic drip irragation system, all excess water runs out of the pot. By suggesting you partially bury the pot, all excess water runs out of the pot, but remains in the area for the roots that will come through the holes to have access to, so you won't have to water near as much as I do. Just remember when you repot the trees, do not bury them any deeper than they originally were planted, the trunk of the tree is designed to get wet but must be able to dry out, exposing some roots(not recommended) is better than burying it deeper.

    Mark

  14. #14
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    Great advise Mark.

    I agree 5 gallon is the way to go if waya waits until fall (which is a great time to transplant, better than spring IMO)

  15. #15
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    Thanks guys, this I can do.

    Do you know of a "how to" book that would help me? I want to "reclaim" my great grandfather's farm back to its original forest. So I'll be planting things like pawpaws, walnuts, oaks, buckeyes, etc. I have some books on propagation, but I'm not sure of the post-sprouting care.

    Since this isn't a for-profit venture, I want to reduce risk the loss to rabbits and other hazzards. If I was doing this for an investment, I could factor in some loss, I suppose.

    Trees have always been a hobby I wanted to persue. Waya
    WayaCoyote

  16. #16
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    Corrigated sewer pipe is a cheap effective rabbit gaurd.

    Check this discussion out for grafting and book ideas.


    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...c;f=6;t=000685

    Here's a nursery I do business with. Good prices on fruit, nut, and other trees.

    http://www.lawyernursery.com/

  17. #17
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    Sundance Bruce,
    I was just about to ask about rabbit guards. How tall should they be? I don't have to worry about deer and the cattle will get fenced out.

    Thanks Again, Waya
    WayaCoyote

  18. #18
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    Go to Home Depot and the like. They have variable diameters. It comes in 10 ft or rolls. Black and white (white is best for your climate). Make sure you get the ventilated type.

    Cut them to any length you need. Usually up to first branch on small trees.

    1/4" hardware cloth works excellent but is more spendy and slower to work with (especially if you need a bunch).

  19. #19
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    http://www.treepro.com/index.html

    I have heard good thigs about the above, though I have never personally used them.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  20. #20
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    I remove my sewer pipe from the trees every spring. Seems varmits are not too much problem in the summer here. The dogs keep the deer at bay.

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