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  1. #1

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    I'm planning a trip out west in the next month or so..do any of you have any prarie dog towns nearby?? I dont really want to spend all my time driving around looking for them. thanks!!
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  2. #2
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    In this area, that is ifnormation that is kept pretty close to the chest. I have to travel three hours west and go with a local that happens to live here.

    Bad mannors closes up good towns by people that don't respect the wishes of the land owner or who don't use uncommon sense while on someone elses property.

    The really big towns are NW of here, waaay NW of here.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #3
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    We call it. "Worshipping at the shrine of the red mist."
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  4. #4

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    Bad mannors closes up good towns by people that don't respect the wishes of the land owner or who don't use uncommon sense while on someone elses property.
    I know what you mean..we have the number 1 deer kill in the state here in our county..man people flock in here like were giving away free beer...shooting from the road..cutting fences..ripping and roaring...a big majority of the farms are now leased by rich out of towners..us poor people have run out of places to hunt..I had to buy a farm just so my kids and I would have a small place to go...
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  5. #5
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    Apr 2004
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    Corralitos, CA, USA
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    Okay I took what I consider the bait. I'm not against legal hunting at all when people intend to eat what they shoot. I enjoy the venison and wild ducks friends serve me on occasion. I like to fish and I slaughter my barnyard fowl. But, why does one shoot and kill wild living creatures which one doesn't intend to eat, or are prairie dogs a secret and unappreciated gastronomic delight?

    Prairie dogs are an important part of the environment. They have been exterminated from much of their range. I'm not entirely opposed to limited control of their populations, where really problematic. But, just shooting them for target practice, I just don't get it.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >But, why does one shoot and kill wild living creatures which one doesn't intend to eat

    The other reason to shoot something is if it's a pest. Prairie dogs, per se may not be, but large prarie dog towns use up a lot of grass and injure a lot of cattle and horses. If you shoot the prairire dogs the population is somewhat controled. If you do not shoot the prairie dogs the ranchers will poison them which will have a cascade effect of killing the prarie dogs and all of the predators and cohabitors. The burrowing owls, black footed ferrets, rattle snakes, eagles, hawks and coyotes. THEN there will be MORE prairie dogs, like there already are.

    >Prairie dogs are an important part of the environment.

    Certianly.

    >They have been exterminated from much of their range.

    The only places I see them there are many more now than 50 years ago.

    > I'm not entirely opposed to limited control of their populations, where really problematic.

    I've never seen them anywhere they did not quickly become problematic.

    > But, just shooting them for target practice, I just don't get it.

    It's called varmit shooting for a reason. And the reason for doing it is to save the burrowing owls, black footed ferrets, rattle snakes, eagles, hawks and coyotes from being poisoned.

    That and it's a REAL challenge to hit a 3" by 9" animal at a half a mile. It's a MUCH smaller animal at MUCH longer ranges than hunting deer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7

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    But, why does one shoot and kill wild living creatures which one doesn't intend to eat.

    I guess my question to this would simply be..santacruz...sir..have you ever set a mouse trap??
    thanks again MB..
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  8. #8
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    I would like you all to note that I did write that, "I'm not entirely opposed to limited control of their populations, where really problematic." Likewise, mouse and rat populations in your home, barn, what have you, are problematic, so control of their populations is important. I'll take out a rat or mouse by any means necessary. I'm much more tolerant of the pocket gophers which plague my gardening, but when pushed, they're dead meat too. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Still, using prairie dogs for target practice isn't too many steps (I'm not saying it's the same!) from using birds of prey for target practice -something that is still a problem in the US.

  9. #9
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    For that matter, in Texas at least, they still do rattlesnake round-ups. We have rattlesnakes in California too, they're great for rodent control. you just don't want to surprise them.

    I think this all revolves around the difference between stewardship of nature and dominion over it. I prefer stewardship -which does include culling populations at times.

    I think that on the whole, prairie dog populations are much reduced over the past. At least one of the species is endangered. Since you and I are only a year difference in age, Michael, and I'll be 51 this spring, I'm quite impressed that you have witnessed the increase in prairie dog populations over the past 50 years. You were an observant little tyke!

  10. #10

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    You were an observant little tyke!
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  11. #11
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    Apr 2005
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    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    We don't have prairie dogs in Pennsylvania but have way too many ground hogs?whistle pigs! Punxsatawney Phil isn't the only groundhog that gets attention, the critters are purely distructive to gardens and farmers crops, the holes or the dirt from the holes cause problems and horse riders sure don't want their animals stepping into the hole and breaking a leg. I have cooked the critters because I do not like to kill and toss any animals but don't like the taste. Never tasted a prairie dog but bet that they are edible. Right now I am ready to declare war on a red squirrel that mutilated one of my best upcoming hives---that critter will get tossed with no remorse what so ever.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  12. #12
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    Apr 2005
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    santa cruz sezs:
    I think this all revolves around the difference between stewardship of nature and dominion over it. I prefer stewardship -which does include culling populations at times.

    tecumseh adds:
    I'm with santa cruz. if you can't eat it, don't shoot it. and I have suggested that when we develope a way of eating varroa mites they will no longer be such a problem. one of our family friends studies prairie dogs via the denver zoo and he says the population of most species is in decline (and yes he studies the soon to be extinct species+ a related species in mongolia). he seemed to have suggested that the problem was more related to disease than hunting pressure, although hybitat destruction typically is a main cause of a wild creatures population decline (and also the decline in beekeepers as far as I can discern).

  13. #13
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    >I'm with santa cruz. if you can't eat it, don't shoot it.

    That's pretty much always been my approach.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  14. #14
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    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  15. #15
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    >>But, why does one shoot and kill wild living creatures which one doesn't intend to eat.

    >I guess my question to this would simply be..santacruz...sir..have you ever set a mouse trap?? [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
    thanks again MB..

    I don't believe in killing anything without a reason. I don't eat the mice or rats I trap but I still have a reason to trap them. I also don't eat the flies I swat either. I do warn them though. "Thunder has come." Swat. "Mitaku'yasin."

    I also think people would be less upset if they realized prarie dogs are rodents, not dogs. My grandpa, who called any rodent a rat, called them "prarie rats". [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
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    http://dogbegone.com/video.htm

    Giggle factor is way up here.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  17. #17
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    Around here, its not just a matter of getting rid of them because their holes injure livestock. I do believe the rodents also carry the Bubonic plague...

    Had to laugh the other day, was talking with the mom and dad of a friend, and the dad and I were talking about the best places to go for target practice for them. We were talking about what a hazard the rodents are for the cattle and horses, especially when they put a foot down the holes. The mom looks at us and says, "Why would that be dangerous? Do the prairie dogs bite their legs?"
    Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by...

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