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Thread: Goats

  1. #81
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    Jan 2005
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    Now I smell like goat...was resting on the milking stand when a downpour came up...thunder and all. All of a sudden all seven goats decided I was their best friend and wanted in my lap...that's all seven WET goats...

  2. #82

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    Be glad it was does and not bucks wanting in your lap!

    LaRae

  3. #83
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    Now I smell like goat...was resting on the milking stand when a downpour came up...thunder and all. All of a sudden all seven goats decided I was their best friend and wanted in my lap...that's all seven WET goats...

    BubbaBob

  4. #84
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    Jun 2005
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    Greensboro, N.C.
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    LMAO. Welcome to farmlife. It's even more fun when one of the kickers lands one solidly in the center of your LAAAAAAAAAP.

  5. #85
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    This keeping goats for fun and profit may actually work out. So far 12 lbs, 10 oz of feta made, 12 lbs, 2 oz sold at $1.25/oz.

    Gotta get more goats...

    BubbaBob

  6. #86

    Post

    LOL oh boy....I've heard that before!

    Congrats!!!

    Just don't get too big too soon..many a person has done that and ended up loosing their shirt when they over produced the demand. It's better to keep people waiting a little, then to have no one buying.

    Some people I know out in CA have been making/selling artisan goat cheeses for years and years. http://www.goatsleap.com/cheese.html

    LaRae

  7. #87
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    LaRae...you got the book "Home Cheesemaking"?

    BubbaBob

  8. #88

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    Ummmm I don't think so....I have had more success getting receipes from other goat people....but I have heard of that book.

    I don't make any hard or cured cheeses...just soft ones like Cherve, Fresh, Feta, Farmer style, Monzerella etc. Some of them take rennet others use a culture.


    LaRae

  9. #89
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    It's the "bible" of home cheese making supposedly...by Rikki Carroll, the founder/owner of New England Cheesemakers Supply.

    I'm going to make some Soft Goat Cheese tomorrow...the book specifically says not to use PVC pipe for molds as it isn't food safe. That doesn't make sense to me...PVC pipe in for potable plumbing...you see any reason not to use 4"PVC with holes drilled as molds?

    BubbaBob

  10. #90

    Post

    Hmmmm I have no idea about pvc pipe..perhaps there are issues within the product itself, the chemicals used to make it??

    I'd do more research on it before I used it if I were you.


    LaRae

  11. #91
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    If the chemicals used were an issue it seems it wouldn't be used for plumbing for drinkable water.

    BubbaBob

  12. #92
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    I've been surprised at the yeild...I'm running about a pound and a half of cheese per gallon of milk...I was expecting about a pound per gallon...pleasant surprise.

    BubbaBob

  13. #93

    Post

    I think it all depends on your proteins/solids in the milk. Higher protein is a good thing.

    You can always send a milk sample to a lab to get exact figures on protein, fat, bacteria etc.

    On the pvc pipe..maybe something in the cheese reacts badly with the pvc??

    I have used plastic cheese molds but they are food grade plastic.

    LaRae

  14. #94
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    PVC is only safe for water when it is buried or under the house where sunlight can't break it down. I'd say they are suggesting the PVC will break down using it as a cheese mold, from light and maybe the cheese bacteria. PVC has some very bad carcinogentics in it. Due to the risk of cancer and specific instructions not to do it, I would find something else.

    Glad to hear things are working out! If I ever get over that way I would like to check out your farm to think about doing diverse for profit ventures too. Taking it easy right now though. Getting about a dozen eggs a day. Free range eggs is some easy production. Go out and fill the feeder. Come back later and gather a dozen free range chicken eggs!

  15. #95
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    I thought about free range eggs, as they bring about 4-5 bucks a doz around here, but there are too many predators...

    BubbaBob

  16. #96

    Post

    Get Great Pyrneese or Akbash Livestock guardian dogs Bob.

    We live in a high predator area (bobcat, fox, Mtn Lion, weasels, coons, possums etc etc)...hardly ever loose a chicken and never lost a goat.


    LaRae

  17. #97
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    May 2005
    Location
    Plano, North Texas
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    I have heard that if you get a donkey to keep with your goats, it will protect the goats from coyotes, dogs, bobcats, etc. I don't think they'd help with a cougar, but may be prey of choice for that big bad boy, thus saving your goats.
    "Before I speak, I have something I'd like to say. . . . I will try to keep this short as long as I can." Yogi Berra

  18. #98

    Post

    The negative to using a donkey is that they can be agressive/territorial and do sometimes injure/kill goats.

    Generally when dealing with larger predators you need dogs...big dogs who are bred to protect livestock and not afraid of predators.


    LaRae

  19. #99
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    Jan 2005
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    OK...a question on dogs.

    I know that traditionally Great Pyreneese are the most used, but as a former Rottweiler breeder, I'm considering using a Rottie that has been raised around goats.

    They are intelligent, fearless, protective of what is "theirs", and very loyal, but while I'd trust them with small children, I know nothing about their interaction with livestock. Any ideas out there? I'm not stuck on using Rotties, but would like to if feasable.

    BubbaBob

  20. #100
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    BB.... We had a Akbash a while ago and it was a wonderful dog, gentle and marked a large territory. My son moved to smaller digs and I had to give it away. Extremely gentle and loving.

    Haven't had a Rot but had a Dob long ago. Not sure I would trust one around livestock.

    http://www.whitelands.com/akbash/main.cfm

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