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Thread: Goats

  1. #61

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    Safeguard is generally useless in goats execept for treating tapeworms.

    Also if you have liver flukes in your state it wouldn't hurt to use Ivomec Plus.

    Here we dose them 1 cc per 50 lbs for Ivomec injectable and 1 cc per 20 lbs for Valbazen (oral)....doseages may vary depending on the area you live in too.

    Also keep in mind coccidia, especially in young goats during hot weather....wouldn't hurt to have them on a coccidia prevention program.


    LaRae

  2. #62
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    May 2005
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    Thanks LaRae,
    Do you do the 3, 6, 9 weeks of age preventative? What do you use to treat?
    I'm finding the Fiasco Farms health pages more and more useful
    http://fiascofarm.com/goats/index.htm
    There just north of here so things should relate well.

  3. #63

    Post

    Well Missouri may well be different than TN. We do have a hot humid climate...and humidity year round (I'd think colder winters though).

    When we bottle feed we pull kids at birth and then at a week or two of age (depending on time of year) we add Deccox-M powder to their milk until weaned.

    After weaning we feed a goat feed (pellet) with deccox in the pellet, until they are around 6 months of age (generally fall)...we don't grain in winter, unless a specific goat has a need for it...not even preg does get grain...just a good quality grass hay, until shortly before kidding.

    We don't feed adults anything with deccox in it.

    If you are dam raising then it's hard to get deccox in the kids until they are eating grain good (generally a month or so of age).

    Having kids as early in the year as possible will help alot too. We prefer not to have any kids born after the end of Feb...but early March seems to be ok too...by the time the hot weather hits they are off to a good enough start that the deccox feed takes care of things.

    Now if your kids have coccidia (fecal test)...then you want to use something like Albon (or generic Albon, called Di Methox) and drench it for 4 days.

    I avoid using Co-rid medication...it strips the body of B, you have to be really careful when using it.

    LaRae

  4. #64
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    Yea we're dam raising. Its just easier for what we are doing. Plus there's the antibodies from momma. I'll probably drench something like Albon. I'll have to see whats avaliable at the co-op. Do you just do it for the 4 days, or do you repeat the treatment later on? I'm noticing the packages of livestock drugs usually don't have any goat information on them.
    This doe aborted kids earlier this year and we let her re-breed. Thats why they are so late. I think this will naturally push her next breeding late again this fall. Just a guess.
    Thanks for the info [img]smile.gif[/img]

  5. #65

    Post

    As you have discovered most everything is 'off label' for goats. You can't go by sheep doseages either most of the time.

    I only treat for Coccidia when I know I have coccidia (fecal test at the vet)...fortunately we rarely have problems with it.

    Albon is very expensive...so we use Di-Methox (Jeffers Supply) instead...it's identical to it.

    I mix 1.5 tablespoons of Di-Methox powder to 1/2 cup of water.

    I drench 15 cc's per 50lbs the first day, then 7.5 cc's per 50 lbs the next 3 days or even 4 won't hurt.

    Since you are dam raising hopefully you don't have any CAE or CL positive animals.

    Generally dairy does cycle the same time deer do. Here it's late summer or early fall, although there are exceptions...and many times the first heat cycle is not a true heat.

    Since we don't have a commerical dairy we only breed does once a year, in Sept/Oct usually.

    Any worming you need to do, be sure you do it 2 weeks prior to worming or a month after breeding when using Ivomec and other wormers...they can cause deformities and abortion also.

    We try not to worm or medicate any doe that is bred unless it's absolutely necessary.

    Do you know why the doe aborted?


    LaRae

  6. #66
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    "Do you know why the doe aborted?"

    No, My only guess is she ate something poisonous.

    I don't like to treat for something I don't see either. This was the first deworming for my 4 month olds and I didn't do any Coccidis prevention, but from what you are saying about summer kids and our recent worm outbreak, I think I probably should do a preventative on these new ones. Thats another reason I want to get a microscope, so I can only deworm when I observe worm infestations, hopefully before a doe gets sick. I was hopeing to not have to worry about worms. My neigbor hasn't dewormed for years with no problems, I guess his goats have gotten used to them or something. Or perhaps my goats brought them in.
    No CAE has been observed in the two herds I bought from so I think the benifits of dam raising outweighs the CAE prevention, for us anyway.

  7. #67
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    WOW, I'm getting old. When we had goats, you carried a pack of chewing tobacco and fed each one a golfball size chunk when you thought it needed it. A spoon of hardwood ashes in a pint of feed every month .
    No worms, no vet bill. Times sure have changed.

  8. #68
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    Jan 2005
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    I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed myself...but that first glass of cold goat's milk, 10 minutes ago, sure was good.

    Onward and upward...or something like that...

    BubbaBob

  9. #69

    Post

    Do you have posionous plants in their field?

    It's a rare thing to find goats that don't have problems with worms. The only breed I'm aware of who has little to no trouble with worms are the Myotonics (Fainting Goats)...they are extremely worm resistant.

    Having a microscope is an excellent idea, I have friends who do their own fecals as well. Also keep in mind that just because there are worms present doesn't mean they need to be wormed...will depend on the actual worm load and the condition of the goat as well.


    Iddee when you have does milking 3000 lbs of milk a year, you aren't worming them with tobacco and hardwood ashes.

    LaRae

  10. #70

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    Bob hang in there...you'll get it down!


    LaRae

  11. #71
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    LaRae, When I had goats, they sold for 3 dollars each and produced a quart of milk a day. Times have changed. LOL

  12. #72
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    $3! My neigbor is kicking himself for getting rid of various rare pure breed goats and sheep some time back. Of course he never bothered keeping up with papers anyway. The goat market has really exploded. meat, milk, and collectors.

  13. #73
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    Well, I'm discovering things already...for example:

    There is a reason store bought milking stands are only 20" wide, rather than 35" like the one I built...if she's a bit shy about being milked, it keeps the goat from putting too much distance between you and her when milking.

    Goat hobbles are not a fru fru thing to get more money out of the goat man by the supplier. They keep the goat's feet out of the milk pail.

    A 5 month old buck is a real trial at keeping in his pen, despite the electric fence wire being 6" apart. The does stay away from the electric, but so far he is just ignoring it and scampering right through.

    A standoffish goat gets REAL friendly when you have a bucket of sweet feed in your hand.

    More later.

    BubbaBob

  14. #74

    Post

    Bob if I had a kicker she'd be gone asap.

    There are too many goats out there with good dairy temperment to have to put up with that.

    I've never had to hobble a goat to milk and I never will either.

    You need to get cattle panels with t-posts and then hot wire the top.

    Iddee I'd say that was a ways back!!!


    LaRae

  15. #75
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    Ha! I've tossed a few pails of poop, trampled goat milk. You should see my first milking stand, its more like a dinner table. I turned it into a chicken tractor.

  16. #76
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    LaRae, if I knew what the heck I was doing I'd prolly be like you about the kicking, but seeing as it was the first goat (or cow for that matter) I've ever milked, it was prolly not the best expirience for her...LOL.

    I prolly squeezed too hard.

    Besides, she didn't exactly kick...just sorta a high step and her foot landed in the pail...three times. Once I got the hang of it she calmed down.

    Now I gotta figger a way to keep the others from wanting on the stand, and their mouth in the feed, while I'm milking one goat. I'm thinking narrowing the stand so there isn't as much room will help.

    Dang that milk was good...kinda like the first honey my bees ever let me sample.

    BubbaBob

  17. #77
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    My doe kicks, but it dosen't matter. You just hobble her, give her plenty of feed and go on about your business. When its done its done and the milk tastes the same. Cracked corn is best in this situation since it takes longer to eat. Takes about 7 seconds to tie her ankles.

    I built a mini-fence around the front of the stand to keep the kids from eating and I bring the doe into the smaller padock to keep the big goats from getting on the stand. The milking parlor is rising on my priority list. Actually it will just be a corner of my workshop with its own entrance. Fighinting off the chickens and rain is becoming a pain too.

  18. #78
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    OK...I've had the goats a couple days...now the stupid questions start.

    Hay. I know to keep stored hay dry, but what about hay I've put in a rack to feed? Does it (the rack) have to be under the shed, or is out in the open OK? Do goats insist on dry hay?

    I've kinda got the hang of milking...or do I? I've been told I should (eventually) milk a goat in 3-5 minutes by hand...not even close so far. Looks like each squirt will maybe fill a thimble. A half gallon per goat, morning and evening, so far is looking like an all day job. When am I supposed to make and sell the cheese?

    Speaking of cheese, I got "Cheesemaking Made Easy" and boy is that book misnamed. She may know how to make cheese, but the author doesn't know squat about passing that information along via the written word. Any other good, understandable books on farmstead cheesemaking?

    More stupid questions later...gotta go milk another goat...

    BubbaBob

  19. #79

    Post

    Generally if hay gets sopping wet they don't like it and you might have alot of waste.

    If you use round bales with a ring, tarp the top of the ring.

    We use square bales so I put out enough hay for one or two days at a time...and if I know it's gonna rain then I just put out enough that they will clean it up pretty soon.

    I've been milking for several years now and I don't always milk one out in 3 to 5 minutes. How fast you milk is going to depend on manual dexterity, teat size, orifice size, cooperation of the goat and amount she milks.

    You should be getting a nice good stream of milk with each squeeze (don't pull)...let the teat fill with milk then squeeze it out...there's a definate rythym to it.

    You might look into one of the email groups on yahoo...just do a search on cheese making.


    LaRae

  20. #80
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    You'll get the hang of it eventually. As I said before, as a kid, I only got a pint per milking, or a quart per day. Didn't take long.
    As a 12 year old kid I could strip a gallon from a cow in 3 to 5 minutes, and direct a stream into your mouth at 15 feet, so I'm sure you will improve as time goes on.

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