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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    estevan, sask, canada
    Posts
    185

    Post

    The shot he was stating was up to 200 yards.THE 270 IS MOST COMMON,EASY TO FIND AMO.i HAVE A MANLICKER 30-O6,nICE RIFLE BUT NEVER USE.Its a hamberger fifle using 150gr.We take lots of bears at my camp,and 30-06 just make me tremble.Skinned over400 bears,if hit in bone,terrible damage.I tell them if thats all they got,slow down below 3000 ft. and load with 200.I personally don't like 30-06 on bears.Also doing taxidermy for 30 plus years,Iz Hates Fixin.LikeMike says,Thats my opinion,my expereances Roger
    B. roger eagles

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...?Item=29878689

    Here's a new 835 rifled barrel ported for $127

    And you do not need an FFL to get it shipped to you.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I agree with Roger...... If your going with a rifle the 270 is hard to beat. I have 2 of them. a Remington 7400 semi and Remington 700 bolts. Ammo is cheap.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Edison NJ
    Posts
    13

    Post

    Im with Mike This mans vast knoledge of all subjects from honey bees weather conditions and now with hunting rifle bulistics I believe he can teach us how to down a water buffalo with a sling shot Anybody want to bet.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    I own quite a few rifles and always go to my killin' gun. A old beat 30 WCF chambered Winchester '94. When something I see needs to get dead this rifle normally does it. Light, handy, ugly (so I don't care if I add a scratch), and plenty powerfull. But I don't think anyone makes a "bad" rifle so pick any you think you like. Better still pick all that you think you might like. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    estevan, sask, canada
    Posts
    185

    Post

    The old winchester is gteat,can evan use it as a paddle and wont hurt it.My heaviest is my 416,good for 8 shots on the bench.Use 400 grain did go threw length of moose and a elk,lead stayed just under the skin onexit.There was 367 and364 grains still held together,and no meat damage.Favorite sweet heart rifle,ruger 243.Nice.Love it.
    B. roger eagles

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,125

    Post

    >Im with Mike This mans vast knoledge of all subjects from honey bees weather conditions and now with hunting rifle bulistics I believe he can teach us how to down a water buffalo with a sling shot Anybody want to bet.

    Weather conditions?

    As a matter of fact, I have written a reloading manual specifically for the .25-06 and would be happy to sell it to anyone interested. You can email me at: bush at inebraska dot com. I have kept careful notes of every load I've ever tried and every shot every fired from my Ruger M77V .25-06 over the last 23 years and have consolidated any reloading information I could find in any reloading manual in print (and out of print) for the .25-06 and .25 Niedner (the name before the wildcat came into the fold).

    I have also compiled all the information I could find on 6.5 x 55mm loads and made notes of loads that I have tried in it and the 6.5 x 55mm Ackley improved. And I would be willing to sell that, if anyone has an interest in that caliber.

    I'm afraid when it comes to shooting water buffalo I will have to plead total ignorance. I have never had the opportunity to even try to shoot one. There are not many in Nebraska and the zoos frown on shooting them. I'm sure, however that anyone who would take one on with a slingshot will be quickly removed from the gene pool. I have shot deer, elk and antelope however. I have seen many buffalo (the American Bison, not the water buffalo) shot with a .270. So I suppose I have a pretty good idea what it takes to kill one of them too, although I was not the shooter.

    I find ballistics to be a most fascinating subject, one which I own scores of books on and have spent many enjoyable hours of the last 23 years studying, practicing and experimenting with.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Water buffalo with a slingshot? It could happen...David did a pretty good job on Goliath with a sling...

    BubbaBob

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I caution anyone and everyone about the use of second hand reloading information. Never use any loading material that is not found in print from a legitment powder or bullet manufacturer.

    Some powders are more forgiving that others and can be reduced or pushed, others absolutely should not. Research and development is done in very specific scientific methodiology in laboratories, is costly to the manufacturers, and should not be dismissed.

    I have seen too many accidents due to not following the exact recepies the manufacturer has set forth. Missing fingers and facial damage is no joke. It is all too easy to get a decimal point out of context, or confuse a starting point with a maximum. Be smart, not a victim of an accident.

    Mike, I would caution you not to open yourself up to the legal liability associated with selling reloading data. It's not worth the risk.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,125

    Post

    The reloading tables are compiled from legitimate sources. The notes are my experience with them. Of course anyone who doesn't follow standard reloading practices such as backing off and working up and looking for signs of pressure can easily harm or destroy their gun and themselves.

    Some of the loads that I found in those legitimate sources (magazines, relading manuals both recent and ancient and reloading annuals) had upper loads I found to be unsafe and I have lowered the listing for the high end. But I have not tried all the loads that I compiled from all those sources. Partly it would be very time consuming to test so many that I don't have a need for and secondly many of the powders are obsolete and I can't find them. The compilation is very useful for a starting point for many powders. They are also very useful if you have a stock of old powder since many of the listings in the really old manuals are for obsolete (no longer manufactured) powders. But many people still have some on hand.

    You may be right that it's not worth it. But I would like to save other's the years of work that went into what I worked out from all that information.

    But then again I was in the gun store the other day and someone was asking if it was normal to have to hammer the bolt open after firing a reload. I wanted to slap him and scream and laugh and cry at the same time.

    Some people should NOT reload. They do not have the mindset required. Lucky for him a bolt action gun is more solid than it is required to be. Not that his will be for much longer if he doesn't change his ways.

    Thanks for the advice.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    You can not stress safety during reloading enough. I always say of you are not 100% comfortable then buy factory rounds.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Thanks for the advice.

    You are welcome.

    Reminds me of a story that an employee of mine told me. His name was Mike too, rest his soul. He was at Camp Perry one year and was doing some hand loading with a simple hand press inbetween matches.

    He would take a case and scoop it full of powder, (I forget what kind), brush it off level, set a bullet on it and press it in.

    This fellow walking by stopped and with dropped jaw and a look of amazement on his face asked, "You been reloading long?"

    Mike replied, "Oh about a half hour."
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Almost ashamed to admit it but when I gotta hunt with a rifle instead of archery I still use a world war 1 gun, it is a 30 40 krag. Does the job.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    Why ashamed? Your kills just as dead and probably cost a fraction of what some peoples latest magnum thunderofgoddeerwhacker rifle does. My opinion is use what suits you and to heck with everyone else.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Be proud of the Krag.... a darn nice rifle.

    I yawn when people wax on about their $2000.00 rifles and perk up and lean forward when they bring up a Krag, Mauser, Arisaka, etc.

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