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Thread: Rock Hounds?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Post

    Hello Everyone,

    Any rock collectors? I know some of you guys grow them, but does anyone bag them and display them? :> )

    I decided that since the bees are pretty sleepy eyed right now, I would shoot a few pictures of my fluorescent rocks. I fooled with all the settings on my digital camera but found that it did the best job when set to automatic and the flash turned off. :> )

    I've posted the shots at:
    http://wind.prohosting.com/tbhguy

    I will eventually replace a couple of the pictures. But it's not too bad for a first pass.

    Regards
    Dennis

    [This message has been edited by BWrangler (edited August 07, 2004).]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Dousman,Wi.U.S.A.
    Posts
    209

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    Dennis: I'm not into rocks but I did enjoy the photos. Your camera did a great job. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    My dad was a big rock hound. When I was 3 years old I started cutting stones out of the slabs that my father had marked. Those diamond saws are weird in that they will not cut your skin but they will cut through your finger nails. When I was five it was one of my chores. The summer after I turn 5 we went to Mount St. Helens and dug volcanic glass. I think it was Wy where we dug Chicken Track. At one of the digs we did that summer I found 3 dino eggs. One had been broken and it must have been a bad egg because you can not see anything developed inside. The second one was nearly intact and when you held it up to a very bright light you could see a dark spot in one end. The third was My prize. It has a dino skeleton inside that can be seen when it is put under bright light. We spent 3 weeks going across the country. I wish I would have been older so I would have took more interest. I remember playing in the snow in a T shirt and shorts. At one of the campsites a bear shook our van and later in the day when I went to the outhouse the bear got between me and van. I was told we went to the ocean in N. Ca. but I do not remember it. I did remember driving through the big red wood. We bought a post card that was a early model chey pick-up gold and white with a camper. The thing that makes it special is our second vehicle was a chevy pick of the same color. They now will not allow cars to drive through the tree. All the rocks we gathered we used to make jewlry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Lightbulb

    I may qualify as a rock hound of a sorts. My oldest daughter (7 3/4) likes rocks and I was wondering where her interest came from. Then one day as I was coming in from the yard I was looking around the house and I realized I had various rocks and crystals assembled on my porch rail and my kitchen window. Aha! The lights went off and I realized she was getting the interest from me.
    There is a place on my property where the geodes seem to be just popping out of the ground. And after a good rain I'll occasionally peruse my yard to look for different types of fossils and see if I can't find anymore bits of Indian arrowheads.
    I've been wanting to find out exactly how the geodes are formed--the crystals inside them and everything. If you know of a good site, Dennis, pass it on to me!
    I never thought of putting some of my rocks under a black light. sounds like it would be a good science project for the girls and me.
    Denise

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

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    aside from the rocks in trees,we've got some interesting geodes around here in southern indiana, you can find round pieces of granite from wisc/mich. left by the glaciers during the ice ages.i grew up in cincinnati,where you can easily find fossilised corals and shells in any creek,some neat stuff.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

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    Hi Denise and Everyone,

    My mother got me started collecting rocks at a very early age. She collected them about the same way you do. It seems like the perfect activity to do with children. It gets them outside and involved with nature. They can use their imagination, develop great observation skills, learn to appreciate colors combinations and textures.

    And they can find their own special treasures and build some wonderful memories as evidenced by the other posts. Sure beats watching tv for another weekend.

    Regards
    Dennis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Question

    knowing bees see ultraviolet, have you ever noticed bees checking these rocks out?i wonder if you could put them on top of the hives to help the bees identify their particular hive and cut down on drifting.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

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    Hoosier Hiver,
    I live on one of the highest points of Hardin County. I find those fossilized sea plants and shells all the time in my yard. It amazes me that at one point in time this part of the continent was under sea water.
    D.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,554

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    Every culture I know of believes the world was all underwater at one time. The Lakota say a pregnant woman was saved from the flood by the Eagle and we all decended from her.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Heyburn, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    48

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    I have been interested in rocks as long as I can remember. I have several diamond saws up to 18" but the last few years I havn't done much cutting. I do take the grandkids out rock hunting and looking for arrowheads. I have taken them to Glass Butte in Oregon a few times and picked up some neat obsidian. The indians from this area most often used this for their points. If anyone would like I would be happy to send you some obsidian.

    Rocks is what got me started in the jewelry trade. Now I am busy making gold jewelry and setting diamonds, hence not a lot of time for rocks.

    I have one grandson (seven year old) that is nuts over rocks, when I take him in my old camper I have a hard time getting him to sleep, he is so excited about the comeing day.
    Winter well,
    Earl White

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Jamestown, IN,
    Posts
    34

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    Heh all, I'm also into rocks. Someone above asked how geodes form....from what I understand, voids or empty space in limestone are slowly filled in by silica and/or calcium carbonate rich ground waters. Due to the atmospheric changes the ground water goes thru when it hits these void spaces, these supersaturated ground waters precipitate out these geode forms.

    Also, as an FYI - the metamorphic rocks (granites, slates, etc) found in the midwest were carried down from the canadian shield by the glaciers.

    The limestone bedrock rich in fossils found beneath the glacial debris (here in IN between 0 to 500 feet in thickness) or south of the southern most glacial advance, points toward the shallow sea history that use to cover parts of the midwest approx. 300 - 500 million years ago.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Heyburn, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    48

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    Hey Dennis, You have a beautiful collection. I truly enjoyed vewing your display. Reminds me of a lady I knew in California. She received a black light from her boyfriend for Christmas. They would go out in the Mojave prospecting. She said took her black light with her one evening and shined it on an outcropping with a pile of rocks in the surface and got a strong reading. They took samples and sent them in for assey and it turned out to be toungston. They put a claim on it and sold it to a large mining company for ten thousand dollars. She said that was the most they ever made with their adventures in the Mojave.
    On another note I have some very interesting geodes I dug out at the Richardson Rock Ranch in Oregon. The ones at the bottom of the deposit are hard to dig but when you get them manyh have like strings where the mineralized mater trickeled in and formed string like formations. I am told they will show up under black light, if you would like one I would be happy to send you one. I am sure they won't be as dramatic as the ones you displayed.
    Winter Well
    Earl White

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spruce Pine, North Carolina
    Posts
    21
    I am glad to see all you rock hounds comming out of the closet. LOL

    I have been a prospector for the past 30 years,most of it working the Pegmatites of western NC. It has been a gerat learning process for me. I hardrock mined Pegmatites for Beryl, for over 20 years.I don't do that anymore because,after drilling and shooting thousands of holes over the years, I found out I would have to go to school to learn how to use powder before I could buy anymore.
    I have worked hydrothermal veins for Hiddenite, Emerald and Rutile crystals.
    I have dug all colors of corundum, Quartz,(smokey and amethyst)and too many minerals to list in this post.
    I have learned to cut cabochons,to facet stones and to cast gold ,(old steam cast method)which I have found.

    All I can say is,It's been great and when God made Bees,Gemstones and Flowers, He outdid himself.

    Best of luck to all you rockhounds.
    Look for the beauty in your finds, not the value.


    PS:
    I do not buy or sell Gems or Minerals.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

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    Hi Earl,John, Weaverbro and Everyone,

    You guys have some great places to do some rockhounding. The western volcanics are a great area. I've always been fascinated with the obsidians and thunder eggs. The different sheens are as beautiful as any gem. I've always wanted to knap a large tool. I even watched a video on it a few times but haven't tried any knapping yet. The obsidian and geodes in Wyoming are pathetic.

    I've also enjoyed working pegmatites in the Black Hills and central Wyoming area. We get quite a few rare minerals but not much in the way of gems like in the pegs back east and down south. A little gem quality heliodore was the best I've found. But the beauty of any of the large crystaline minerals is spectacular. Always lots of fun!

    Wyoming has lots of fossils but not the kind you guys have back east. Most of ours are land based with very few good sea fossils. Trilobites are rare here. I've never found one.

    Waiting for warmer weather.

    Best Regards
    Dennis

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    How many duckbills dinos have you dug up?

    The person that looked at my eggs said they thought that was the type of dino but would have to have further test run to be sure. I need to dig them out of the barn and have them displayed but I am afraid of my son breaking them.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

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    Hi Guys,

    Check this site out:
    http://www.fourth-millennium.net/fl-...dventures.html

    Be sure to click on the pictures and read about the adventures.

    I think I'm getting cabin fever just thinking about getting out and doing some exploring.

    Regards
    Dennis

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Post

    Hello Everyone,

    Check out the picture of fossil comb on page 129 of the February 2004 American Bee Journal. It's easy to see how the mineral replacement occured.

    Regards
    Dennis

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Post

    Hey b-wrangler, I do a bit of gold mining here in california. I have a drywaher, & a highbanker. Is there any gold in Wy?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Post

    Hi CB

    Not much gold here. Lots of energy type stuff but precious and base metals are scarce.

    Regards
    Dennis

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi

    Here's another great collecting adventure. Check out:
    http://www.luminousminerals.com/gree...ilimaussaq.stm

    It's pretty good reading for snow bound fluorescent mineral collectors.

    Enjoy
    topbarguy

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