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Thread: maple tower

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Elizabethtown,KY
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    I have a large maple tree directly behind my house about 10 feet off my deck. Two years ago , one of the forks of the tree came off during a storm. A few days ago the other fork split off and thankfully it too fell into the ravine below the house. Now what's left is this big trunk with only 7 smaller branches. By all appearances the tree is,was healthy(leaves on all branches)
    I'm not sure what to do with this tree.Not having a top, will it die--it definitely will be exposed to disease, I know. Should I get someone to cut it down, than let the Amish make some wood for potential kitchen cupboards,with the hopes that I may one day be able to build a new kitchen? Should I sell the wood to them? If I have it cut up for cabinets can I wait to retrieve the logs till this fall?
    I also thought about making a bench ,like I've seen at some parks, and placing it near the apiary.
    I appreciate any input. Maybe you all can give me some tips or pointers and help me think this through a little better.
    Thanks,
    Denise

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I've actually seen people trim cottonwoods and elms that severly and they grow a very bushy stubby tree eventually. (why they do that is mystery to me) There is a good root system on a tree that size and they will grow a lot of small limbs quickly, but it will never look like a tall stately maple again. If it doesn't get a disease it will probably do fine. It depends on what you want.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
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    571

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    is it a sugar/red maple,or silver maple?.sugar maples (the type that turn beautiful reds and oranges in the fall) are a harder wood,good for furniture,etc.silver maples(leaves turn dull yellow in fall) have softer wood and is not valued as much.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
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    I wish it was a sugar/red maple. But then again, I'd be out a beautiful tree. The leaves do turn yellow but I considered them to be a bright yellow. Sounds like I'd be wasting my time to try and get it cut up for cabinets. Guess I'll just add it to my list of when I get around to it projects. So I take it this would not be a desireable tree for firewood? Even if I give it away?
    Thanks for the advice.
    I could carve it into a totem pole!
    Denise

  5. #5
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Any maple makes very good firewood.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2002
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    Elizabethtown,KY
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    I decided to leave the tree standing as is and it should be a great vantage point for the Cooper's hawk and red-tailed hawks over-looking the ravine. Maybe the Barred owl will like it too.
    D.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    If it's tall enough to offer a view they will probably use it.

  8. #8
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    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    I don't know, Denise, I kind of liked the totem pole idea. Would probably be the only one in the neighborhood. You could carve it to look like a series of honeybee-related symbols. Just kidding, but only halfway. I would carve a totem pole in my yard in a second if the right tree was damaged, but the only dead damaged tree I have here is what used to be a huge red oak that was hit by lightning about 10 years ago, and it stands on the edge of a steep creek bank and is about 15 ft tall and 3 ft in diameter. It would take an enormous amount of carving, and I don't have the patience or the talent to take on a project like that, lol. We do have lots of American Elms on the property that seem proned to damage in storms, but they always seem to survive the damage. They can be hit, split in half with each half lying over opposite each other, and they just keep on growing.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Are you sure they are "American" elms? I watched them all die when I was a child. I was under the impression they were extinct. I do have a lot of Chinese elms in my yard.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Lineville Iowa
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    66

    Lightbulb

    I may be wrong but dont American Elms have the big oval leaves while Chinese elms have the smaller oval leaves ??
    Zeke

  11. #11
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    It's been a long time since I saw an American Elm, but that's the way I remember them. Also the old American Elms were four or five feet across. The Chinese Elms only get a couple of feet across.

  12. #12
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    Aug 2002
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    Elizabethtown,KY
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    I did see two red-tails using a tree a little bit further down the ravine this past winter. The cooper's hawk likes the redbud beside the deck. It surprised me to see the red tails but I guess the ravine was open enough for them to scout for squirrels and chipmunks. It's all deciduous trees so I'm guessing they don't use the ravine in the summer. do red tails eat crows?
    This past spring while hiking my property I found a cedar tree that had been cut and the "stump" stood about 4 feet high. I found some old crow feathers and what looked like dove feathers. Looks like something uses this stump for a dinner table quite frequently.
    D.

  13. #13
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    I have seen crows chase redtails and I've seen a redtail on the ground with a dead crow in it's talons and it's wings half spread daring the other seven crows around it to just try something.

  14. #14
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    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    The crows here harrass the red tail hawks and the owls on a regular basis.
    I do think they are American elms, but I'm no tree expert. The leaves are large and the trees get pretty big. Most of the ones on our property have a trunk diameter of 24-36 inches. They tend to have a very wide canopy with three to four large branches from a fork about 8 feet off the ground. They are generally about as wide as they are tall, if not wider. I can take pix and email them to anyone who wants to ID them. The elms we have with the small leaves are called cedar elms in this area.

  15. #15
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    Aug 2002
    Location
    Lineville Iowa
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    66

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    i have alawys marvelled at how blackbirds
    will harass buzzards/Vultures while the buzzzrds seem to have no intention of harming anything .
    Zeke

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