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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    I don't know of anyone that eat's eucalyptus,you try to eat sourwood & it is sour sure makes good honey.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    there is eucalyptus in parts of california that has been introduced,it has also been introduced into alot of asia,i'm sure there are several varieties.back on the subject of locust,honey locust,(glediitsia triacanthos) is the locust that has thorns and is not a nectar source as far as i know,black locust(robinia pseudoactia) is a honey tree and doesn't have thorns.there are ornimental honey locusts that do not have thorns.both are good fire wood,and good for fence posts.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    NSW,Australia
    Posts
    77
    Yellow Box (Eucalyptus melliodora) and Blue Gum (Eucalyptus leucoxylon ) honey is from Eucalyptus
    It is widley sold in Supermartkets and tastes
    like normal honey.... very nice


  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    NSW,Australia
    Posts
    77

    Cool

    also

    Red Gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis
    and
    Iron Bark Eucalyptus crebra

    are poplular here too

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    Update on the Simpson's Honey Plant. The bees seem to love it. It's not a particularly pretty plant, but good for addition of green to the perennial garden. I didn't think it would bloom the first year, but it did. The tiny little flowers are a rosy brown color, barely noticeable, but the bees think they are just great.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    Nobody has mentioned the tulip tree (also called tulip or yellow poplar, although it has nothing to do with the poplar, a willow relative, but belongs to the magnolia family).

    It is a beautiful tall tree that has an almost perfectly straight trunk and huge flowers that look like a tulip or lilly, The flowers produce and collect massive amounts of nectar at the base of the petals. You can in fact turn the flower over and drink a sip of nectar ... no wonder bees like it.

    Jorge

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Found a site www.forestfarm.com that has all kind's of plant's. they have a listing they call Honey plants.>>>>>Mark

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Smile

    i've got a field near my house full of joe-pye weed,must be 8 ft tall.what a beautiful site,and how about how the brilliant goldenrod and the vibrant purple of the iron weed complement each other.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    27

    Post

    I'd really like to plant some Basswood (also called Linden) trees. But there are serveral varities and I'm not sure if they are all good honey trees. I know there was an article in the ABJ about Lindens maybe from the other year, but I don't know where I have that copy. If anybody can clue me in on the best basswood, that would be great!

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