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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    what's everyone's favorites at the moment,i've been planting buttonbush and blackgum alot this spring.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    I have this wonderful bamboo plant I got from someone farther north, It blooms really late in the fall, and my bees loved it. As soon as I figure out just how invasive it is, I will split it and encourage it to spread in a controlled environment. I want to plant some Black Locust too, but haven't found a source for it. My other favorites are my Jack in the Pulpits and Trilliums, but the bees don't really care for them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    There are lot's of black locust here. They are very aggressive and very hard to handle due to the thorns. I always liked them anyway except when getting stuck. They are quite poisonous and it takes weeks for a deep stick to heal.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    Hoosierhiver, how many years is it before a new buttonbush plant blooms? I have some growing wild on the place, but also started some from seed this year, and was just wondering how long I'll have to wait for blooms from the new ones.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i've read it takes 5 years,but i've seen them bloom after 3 yrs.goldfinches and ducks like the seeds.a better way to propagate them is from cuttings or just bury part of a branch that is still attached to the main bush,water it well for a few weeks then it should be rooting out from the burried part,cut it and transplant.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    I've been wanting to find some sourwood trees. I finally was able to purchase 3 of them at the Bernheim Forest & Arboretum annual plant sale today. Now to figure out where to plant them!
    Denise

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    I discovered this week that bees in this area love Carolina Buckthorn (think that's what it's called). I have some that grows wild along the creek, and they have been in it heavily for about a week now. Seems they are ignoring about everything else, at least on my place. I have no idea if it produces much of anything for nectar, but there's something about it that the bees love.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    dragonfly,
    I noticed the same thing a couple of years ago. The bees love it! I have a few trees right next to the apiary. I assume I have more on the rest of my property.
    Denise

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    Be careful with the buckthorn, don't know how it is related to the buckthorn here in MN, (I think it's a European Buckthorn) but it has been placed on the invasive list, it started as an ornamental, but is no longer even legal to sell, it takes over everything, and crowds out natives, and spreads like crazy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    I don't think the Carolina Buckthorn is invasive, at least I've not heard that or seen evidence of it. It doesn't seem to spread that easily via seeding, and I don't think it spreads by the root system, but I could be wrong. Now, roughleaf dogweed is what I call invasive, and unfortunately, the bees don't seem to work it. It has pretty little white flower clusters that remind me of viburnum, but I've yet to see a bee on it. Well, maybe one bee.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Like dragonfly, I've not noticed any invasiveness of the Carolina buckthorn.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Blue thistle,or globe thistle,grow's wild around here.the farmer that I've got a bee yard on his place plant's about 2 acre's of wild flower's every year so I guess that is why there is so much thistle there.there is a patch of it growing next to my bee's that has the hill side covered in it.I was looking at it & noticed a bee almost on every flower.I came back home & dug out my old copy's of A.B.J. & found it in the may 2002.(by the way did I tell you I was a pack rat.)It said the plant is known in the beekeepering name as Chapman's honey plant .one thing for sure my bee's love it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    What do any of you know about Simpson's honey plant, aka Scrophularia Marilandica, or Late Figwort? I read that it is a great bee plant, and I have started about thirty of them from seed this year that appear to be doing very well. Do any of you have experience with this one? I have yet to see if it can survive the Texas summers, but I think I read that it grows wild down into Oklahoma, which is not much better.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Jameson, MO USA
    Posts
    76

    Question

    Is there any kind of Locust tree which is not a thorny proposition? I've heard of other kinds, but don't know what they are.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    Joel, there's a variety of honey locust that is thornless, but believe it or not, I've read that it's not a good bee tree. Maybe this information was incorrect, but check on it before you plant any because they're not particularly pretty trees.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I have 3 Honey Locust trees with no thorns. They make very good shade but drop many seed pods in the fall and this makes quite a mess as the pods are 6 to 12 inches long and are a very dark brown color. In 20 years of beekeeping I have never seen a bee near these trees so I assume that the bees don't like the flowers on the trees in the spring. The birds do not even eat the seeds from the pods and the squirls seem to avoid the trees completly. These trees seem to have a very strong odor that repels the animals.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    you guys are right honey locust are not a nectar source,they can be a nice shade tree.black locust is what the bees like,but it's not an especially pretty tree,except when it's blooming.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    an endangered and relatively unknown tree grows in my area,the yellow wood tree (cladistrus lutea)sp?,when it blooms which is infrequently it produces outragous big grapelike clusters of purple flowers.a beautiful native tree.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    NSW,Australia
    Posts
    71

    Post

    In Australia the Eucalyptus tree is the best source for nectar.

    Ive seen trees teeming with bees in them. ( and Koalas too )

    Are there many Eucalypts over there.?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    I don't think there are any eucalyptus trees here. But I could be wrong. What does eucalyptus honey taste like? If it tastes like eucalyptus, it doesn't sound that good, but then honey is sometimes suprising.

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