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Thread: Morrels

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bedford,KY,USA
    Posts
    29

    Post

    It's best to cut and eat poke while it's still small. After it's tall and thick it really needs to have the tough outer skin removed or it will be real stringy and tough. Used to really enjoy the morels here in Kentucky until last year I got very sick after eating quite a lot of them. So this year I tried eating just a few bites to be safe, got the same results. Havn't quite figured out why, but I quess "change really is the only constant".

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    there are false morels which are somewhat poisenous,the pattern on the mushroom is wavy, not cell like.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i have several morel superstitions i attest to,1)you got to pay your dues,you must do some hiking before you are worthy.2)if your cocky,the morel gods will be less inclined to favor you.this includes brazenly carring sacks around.3)once you eat one,it gets in your blood stream and makes to more psychically intuned to the morel.4)if you act like you've given up and are just enjoying a hike they sometimes let down their gaurd and don't hide as well.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Post

    I completely agree with Hoosier, but this year for Iowa is an exception I think just about anyone could go out and find a bag full in Southern Iowa! In the past couple of days I've found about 500 greys, yellows, small and large. I'm kinda sick of eating them, but the addiction keeps me heading out to the woods.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Jameson, MO USA
    Posts
    76

    Cool

    I like Dragonfly's idea of planting some Poke Salad. Think I'll also plant some Potatoes and Gravy. If Hoosierhiver will plant the Fried Chicken, we can have us a feed!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Smile

    I'd like to come to that cook,But Hoosierhiver please leave your rock at home. Mark

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i put in a few rows of biscuits the other day.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

    Post

    Greetings,

    Yesterday, I went mushroom hunting in the mountains to the south of us. The day was cold and cloudy. A few blue mason bees were working the pussywillows that are now blooming.

    Didn't find a single morel. Yep, I had a bag just in case:> )

    But I did see a single honeybee working a pussywillow bloom! Could a feral hive have survived the winter at altitude? It's thirty miles and at least 3000 vertical feet from this location to the closest known honeybees. And I have never seen a honeybee in this survive in this environment in 30 years.

    Regards
    Dennis
    Thinking of switching from mushrooms to bees

    [This message has been edited by Admin (edited May 18, 2003).]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,802

    Post

    Maybe you should set up some bait and beeline back to the hive and see. It would be a wonderful start for some genetic stock for there.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Castle, VA USA
    Posts
    90

    Post

    Here in SW VA morels are pronounced murkles, farther southwest in Va, they are called dryland fish. Don't know why, they don't taste anything like fish to me. Under apple trees is the best place to find them. Second best is poplars, followed by ash. Any ginseng hunters out there?

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