Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I am trying to decide on two things:

    1) should I prime the cell cups with royal jelly?

    2) should I use a swarm box?

    any advise?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,949

    Post

    1) I tried it and decided there was no difference. Jay Smith tried it long before me and came to the same conclusion.

    2) I keep meaning to try it, but haven't got it done. It's a well proven method if you do it right. Marla Spivak's method is similar to Jay Smith's except for the use of a wet sponge on the bottom for water for the swarm box. Both Marla and Jay put open brood above an excluder so they can just shake the bees off of these combs and know there are a lot of nurse bees that were busy nursing when you shook them in and now have no brood to feed, so they will feed the queen cells.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Michael: In Jay's book, he mentions to prime the cells with royal jelly mix.

    When they put the open brood above an excluder, do they do this a few days before making up the swarm box?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,308

    Post

    You put open brood above the excluder as you make the swarm box. That way after the grafts have been in the swarm box for 24 hours you place them next to the open brood above the excluder to get the queen cells finished.

    The only reason to put open brood above the excluder a few days before making up the swarm box would be if you are hopeless at finding queens. I would shake all bees into the bottom box and place the open brood above the excluder. Later, when the bees cover the open brood you know that the queen is below the excluder and you know those are young nurse bees, just the ones needed for the swarm box.

    Jean-Marc

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,162

    Post

    I would say that neither is necessary for success, but wet grafting sure is a lot easier for me. The larva floats easily off the spoon and does not dry out during grafting or transfer to the cell builder. RJ is not the only thing you can prime a cell with but it is what I like.
    JBJ
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    what other things can u use rather than RJ?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    196

    Post

    Warm water, just the smallest drop from a syringe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Eden, NC
    Posts
    285

    Post

    I used to prime cells as an advantage to removing larva. I now dry graft. Usually I can get the small larva off with no problem. IMO grafting with royal jelly is a waste of time, when normally the nurse bees will remove all existing jellies and replace with new.
    Frank

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,949

    Post

    >Michael: In Jay's book, he mentions to prime the cells with royal jelly mix.

    In better queens he says he gave it up because they just remove it anyway. I saw no difference in acceptance or quality when I did it, and it was a lot less work to not do it.

    In Queen Rearing Simplified, I believe (but I'll have to look it up later) that Jay said he did prime the cells with royal jelly. Doolittle also did, if I remember right.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    When I graft into wax cells I donÂ’t mind grafting dry but into plastic I usually put a drop of fresh honey that I get from the frame that I am grafting from.
    If a job is worth doing - Then do it well

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads