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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,191

    Post

    I read through this book and surprisingly enough, didn't find that much to get excited about. The basis of his method is non-grafting, using large quantities of bees to start and finish the cells, and feeding of honey rather than sugar syrup.

    What I would add today is use of collected pollen to enhance the nutritional status of the starters and finishers.

    It is a very good book to read but there are other queen breeding books that should be considered.

    The small scale queen breeder will have difficulty adapting some of the methods because they are set up for raising large numbers of queens.

    Fusion

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Post

    Looks like, and I have only gottan through about half the book, that he is suggesting using the "punching" method of queen rearing were you cut up some cells and place them on a frame with no grafting.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
    Posts
    474

    Post

    Yes,I think George said it best,we get further and further in your debt.

    I am trying to understand the wood frames...?

    Also,was Mr. Smith using hives with frames that ran the "warm" way? That is the only way I can see to create a front and rear compartment?

    Mr.Smith's enthusiasm IS contagious,isn't it?

    Thanks again Mr. Bee

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >I read through this book and surprisingly enough, didn't find that much to get excited about. The basis of his method is non-grafting, using large quantities of bees to start and finish the cells, and feeding of honey rather than sugar syrup.

    His goal is the "best possible queens". His previous book, "Queen Rearing Simplified", which I hope someday to put online as well, was for many years "the" book on grafting. If you want to make a lot of good queens, it's a good book

    >It is a very good book to read but there are other queen breeding books that should be considered.

    Most of which are variations on his methods in "Queen Rearing Simplified".

    >The small scale queen breeder will have difficulty adapting some of the methods because they are set up for raising large numbers of queens.

    True, he doesn't really talk about the little breeder until the end, but you can still do graftless queen rearing with a scaled down version of his system.

    >Looks like, and I have only gottan through about half the book, that he is suggesting using the "punching" method of queen rearing were you cut up some cells and place them on a frame with no grafting.

    Sort of. But he's cutting STRIPS out not, puching one cell.

    >I am trying to understand the wood frames...?

    He's trying to limit where the queen has to lay so she will lay in the new comb he gives her every day, and not find some other nice place to lay, while at the same time giving her and the bees some room.

    >Also,was Mr. Smith using hives with frames that ran the "warm" way? That is the only way I can see to create a front and rear compartment?

    He was fond of Dadant hives. I don't have the pictures handy right now, as I sent them with a friend to scan them in.

    >Mr.Smith's enthusiasm IS contagious,isn't it?

    I think so.

    >Thanks again Mr. Bee

    You're welcome.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Wimauma, Florida
    Posts
    271

    Post

    Mr.Bush,
    Thanks for the info. Saved the book to disc and printed out. Got to this forum on your account too!

    Thanks Again, Albert
    September 8th 2007 is National Beekeeping Day
    American Agriculture, its as close as the nearest Honeybee!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I have added the pictures to the book.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Michael,

    Thanks for the info. There's lots of stuff in this little book that would take a queen producer decades to discover. At least it took me that long :&gt

    And yep, the bees will always make the best queen possible with the resources available. A queen producer, who understands this, will be way ahead of the crowd when he works with his bees instead of the other way around.

    Grafting techniques can still be used to maximize very early larva feeding. It requires using a Chinese grafting tool. With it, a larva can be grafted as soon as the egg bends over and the bees supply the very first feed. It will look just like a damp spot on the bottom of the cell with the egg laying down on it. With other tools, it's impossible to consistently graft such young larva without damaging them.

    But even the Chinese tool must cause some disturbance. And I'm not quite sure that the waxing, dunking, cooling, etc. of the cell strip, used with Jay's method, would cause less disturbance than using the Chinese tool.

    The best method might be something like a Hopkins method that could be done with eggs in the comb an d no disturbance to the larva at all.

    I've built a tool for grafting eggs according to Steve Taber's plans. But I've only tested it on a limited basis. I got the same kind of results he did.

    Regards
    Dennis

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I'm planning on more work with the Hopkins method. It has the added advantage of not needing any special equipment except a shim to hold it up.

    One of the nice things about a Jenter is that you can transfer them when they are so small you can't hardly see them as anything but a slight break in the smooth surface of the food AND you get all the food with the transfer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Post

    I agree with you about the jenter method but never liked that fact that you had to confine the queen although I am getting better at handeling the queen. I ove those queen muffs!!!
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I don't handle queens much. I use a hair clip queen catcher most of the time to catch her and put her in the Jenter box. You still have to be gentle of course, but it's easier than accidentally pushing her down too hard.

    I am enjoying the queen muff a lot. I have had only one queen fly since I bought it and that was my own fault.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beecher Il
    Posts
    76

    Post

    Thanks MB
    Great book to read on a cold winter day.
    Al

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Nottinghamshire, England
    Posts
    25

    Post

    This work alone makes my small contribution to the site insignificant. I shall be sending a little Christmas gift to the site. Hillside, any chance of a version in isilo or mobipocket for the English?

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >This work alone makes my small contribution to the site insignificant. I shall be sending a little Christmas gift to the site.

    That's a great idea. I think you should. But just to clarify, the book is not on this site, as in www.beesource.com, it's on my site, as in www.bushfarms.com. Since I'm not collecting contributions, one for here would always be appreciated by all of us, I'm sure.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Nottinghamshire, England
    Posts
    25

    Post

    Done. Thank you Mr. Bush and everyone who has helped me with their contributions.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Thanks Mr Bush. It is appreciated.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    Buzz,

    I haven't had much chance to do much more than scan the forums lately so I missed your question about other reader formats. I'm sorry that I don't have software to make other formats. Maybe someone reading the forums will chime in with a solution for you.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    53

    Post

    Thanks again Michael for making "Better Queens" available to all of us.

    I'm not quite clear on Jay's technique of cutting the comb into strips. What happens to the larvae on the other side of the midrib of the comb? I can't make out exactly what is happening here from the pictures. I'm guessing they are just entombed when the wax is brushed on. Is that what is happening?

    Thanks

    Tim
    You cannot move a grain of sand upon the beach that you do not effect the entire universe.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >I'm guessing they are just entombed when the wax is brushed on.

    Yes. I usually confine the queen on one side with #5 hardware cloth so there are none on the other side. Jay, apparently, didn't like confining her.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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