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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
    Posts
    125

    Post

    I put a queen into a queenless hive yesterday using a push in cage. I guess I didn't push it in enough because it was laying on the bottom of the hive this morning. I checked the hive so early because I wanted to see if they were porcipining the cage. Anyway, I found the queen and luckily they had accepted her. I decided to put her back in the cage just in case. Was it right to put her back in the cage, or should I have just left her out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    726

    Post

    She probably would have been fine if you left her since the appeared to have accepted her and were not balling her. Though putting her back in the cage didn't hurt anything.

    I have been surprised sometimes how quickly a hive will accept a new queen. I wached my observation hive eat through the candy and release her in 12-18 hours and they happily accepted her and she was laying again almost immediately upon release. Yet I've seen others that ball the queen even after nearly a week.

    -Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    It probably didn't matter once she was out and not being attacked. I'd leave her loose at that point.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    Tarheit makes good points.
    It seems to depend on the colony (or the queen) if they accept her fast or slow.

    The questions you may pose to yourself are:
    "How many queens do I have to sacrifice?",
    "How many hives do I have to support the queenless?"

    If you have neither a supply of queens or only a few hives, I think a slower approach may work better.

    Given that the queen was seen to be accepted, I agree with michael, the less handling and the less possibility to injury the queen the better.

    JEFF
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    Hi all
    Lots of swarm cells this year so made a lot of nucs, but what to do about all the rainy weather and the boys and girls can't get out to play. I am trying to create a wingless drone that will take his services, door to door conjugal visits so to speak. Picture if you will a drone that will deliver and if there are no young ladies there, he might just do the old ladie making her lay eggs for an extra year or two.
    Let me know what you think of this plan. There may just be grant money for a hairbrained idea like this.
    sterlingc

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Same thing happened to me where a queen released herself or the hive released her. She was accepted and the hive had many more eggs going that the other hives where the queen wasn't released. I was pleasantly surprised. Wish it was always this easy.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
    Posts
    125

    Post

    I released her the next day with no problems. However, the second queen I released this morning they started to ball.(Russian in a Italian hive)I saved her and put her in a nuc with Russian bees instead. I'll just combine the queenless hive with the nuc later.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    [Russian in a Italian hive]

    The USDA will tell you that it may take upto 12 days to properly introduce a Russian queen to a none Russian colony.

    Your idea of using a nuc is a perfect idea.

    I have had success in introducing a Russian queen into a very weak split. Keep in mind however, the reduced population also means a weaker foraging force, and this in turn will return little pollen and little nectar. A very frugal Russian queen may detect this as a dearth and nearly cease egg laying.

    Your idea of joining the nuc to the hive is also a great idea.

    This will bring population numbers back up to where the queen should lay normally.

    Good thinking, and good luck.

    JEFF
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
    Posts
    125

    Post

    Thanks Jeff,
    How long do you think I need to wait until combing the hive and the nuc? The books say don't disturb a hive with a new queen for a week...think I need to wait that long?

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