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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    found this paper about turning 100 into a 1000 in a few month's and wondered if any one has tryed it and how did they do.

    http://www.apimondia.org/apiacta/slo...yeganehrad.pdf
    Ted

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
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    456

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    I guess this is possible - raising 900 queens isn't unbelievable. Ending up with 1000 viable hives sounds hard to achieve.

    I have tried a 1:10 split with purchased queens and heavy feeding but with sorry results. I didn't try their approach to feeding pollen and honey (feeding anyone's honey but my own scares me). Not sure what Caspian Solution, unpublished contents bring out the skeptic in me, all I can say is caspianapiaries in Canada promotes it like you would promote a 'cure-all'.

    The apimondia article fails to specify what pheromes are in the 'Caspian Solution'. I'm not sure which pheromes stimulate the hypopharangeal glands. The article states the feeding was to stimulate raising queen cells. I would think the bigger problem is how do you stimulate 1 hive of nurse/worker bees enough to raise 10 hives of brood? According to the article they were giving each nuc 2 frames of bees (not brood).

    Raising queens doesn't sound like the challenge, it is figuring out how to stimulate the workers enough to raise 10x the normal brood.
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,417

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    What happened with you 1:10 split?

    I was thinking of doing something simular... like maybe a 1:5 split or something like that depends on how this winter works out.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

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    I did a 12 to 50 split last year, with very mixed results. Some good, some very baaaaddddd. So far I still have 26 viable hives, we'll see when spring gets here. Most of my problems stemmed from robbing of my nucs, which once started is very hard to stop. The YJ's were a total pain in the butt.

    You missed the paragraph that states 100 frames of brood and population that they bought.

    [size="1"][ January 10, 2006, 11:00 AM: Message edited by: peggjam ][/size]
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

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    The 1:10 split ended up as exactly 1 hive the next spring.
    Inputs:
    1 hive
    10 queens
    10 medium frames of honey
    10 drawn frames
    2 or 3 50lb bags of sugar
    a lot of work

    Output:
    1 hive
    No honey
    10 almost empty frames of comb
    10 moth damaged frames
    10 empty queen cages (ha)
    A pointless exercise.

    1:4 split ended up as 3 strong hives the next spring (two were combined when a queen was lost)

    Yes, robbing was a problem
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

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    During the summer way up north the days can be pretty long so that might help.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    761

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    I read somewhere about a beek that had high winter losses and needed to increase his hive count drastically. Basically, the process he used was to take 1 frame of brood (with bees) from each of 8 strong hives, a frame feeder of sugar syrup (as frame # 9) and a frame of foundation. He put these into a new hive and added a store-bought queen. He repeated this each week, starting about 6 weeks before the honey flow and continuing thru summer (with heavy feeding of 1:1 syrup). As soon as the queens started laying in the new hives, these hives also contributed 1 frame of brood per week. His contention was that 1 frame per week could be taken from a strong hive without reducing the hive's honey yield, was a good swarm control mechanism, and the resulting new hives would be strong enough from the git-go to produce honey or pollinate crops. As best I can recall he started with some multiple of 8 hives and had hundreds by August. I did the math: starting with 8 hives you would have 91 strong hives in 24 weeks.

    I tried this last season, but didn't get started until about 2 weeks before the flow and chickened out when the flow started and I got too busy doing removals. Anyway, I completed two cycles and the resulting two hives each produced about 40lbs of honey and seem to be overwintering well.
    Triangle Bees

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

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    >Basically, the process he used was to take 1 frame of brood (with bees) from each of 8 strong hives, a frame feeder of sugar syrup (as frame # 9) and a frame of foundation. He put these into a new hive and added a store-bought queen.

    That sounds very doable.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    monroe, nc, US of A
    Posts
    29

    Post

    Could you do this with 5 frame nucs? A. useing 2 frames brood, new queen, one frame foundation (frame with starter strip, maybe?),frame feeder and follower board to reduce space. or B. One frame brood, one frame of foundation or drawn comb or frame with starter strip(which?),frame feeder, follower board to temporally reduce space.
    I am in south central NC. When could I start this process, assuming I can get queens. Any suggestions appreciated. Could I use nuc top feeders instead of the frame feeders, I prefer them.I use full size frames. Thanks.
    HAR

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    4,082

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    HAR:

    You can do anything you want, they're your bees. I bought some nucs last year that I noticed had capped queen cells in them when I went to move them into standred boxes. After being sure that there was a laying queen, I split each nuc in half, I should also note that this was about the middle of May, they did very well, and resulted in many more splits during the summer. I should say that honey production was not of prime concern, and because of continued splits, they produced no honey crop.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    I should also note that capped queen cells are quite often found in nucs if the producer didn't take the time to destroy them pior to installing queens. This will sometimes result in the rejection of the installed queen, so before killing these queen cells it is best to make sure there is a laying queen.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    You can make a split all the way down to a two frame nuc and probably have it survive. But there is a point of "critical mass" where the number of bees is enough that they can easily thrive, instead of struggling. Once they reach that point they take off quicker. Five frames makes a nice size split that will build up to critical mass quicker than less will. Ten frames of brood and honey and bees will reach that even sooner. A booming hive can rear more brood than a struggling nuc. That's why I think the plan to steal a frame of brood every week from ten strong hives makes a lot of sense. The strong hive stay strong and continue to raise a lot of brood. The split is big enough to thrive and not just struggle.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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