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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    I will apologize for this question up front! sorry...

    If my NWC queen breeds with a hot feral, do I stand a greater chance of having a hot brood or gentle/in between?

    background....OK, I hope to have around 13 hives at the end of the winter assuming they make it. I want 20 strong hives by the end of next year.

    Another goal is to have gentler hives than I have now.

    I will order as many NWC queens as I can afford, but not as many as I need..., so I plan to take NWC eggs from a gentle hive and place them in a hot hive made queenless. The new queen will mate with who knows what, probably a hot feral, hence my question about temperment. thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    >If my NWC queen breeds with a hot feral, do I stand a greater chance of having a hot brood or gentle/in between?

    The drones have more to do with temprament than the queen. But who says the ferals are all hot?

    >Another goal is to have gentler hives than I have now.

    Just keep requeening the hot ones. They will get gentle eventually.

    >I will order as many NWC queens as I can afford, but not as many as I need..., so I plan to take NWC eggs from a gentle hive and place them in a hot hive made queenless. The new queen will mate with who knows what, probably a hot feral, hence my question about temperment. thanks for the help.

    Usually when I've dequeened a hot hive and let them raise their own queen, the daughter was much nicer than the mother. Mine are all open mated and I don't have problems with hot bees. Mine are also all from offspring from ferals swarms.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,212

    Post

    Echoing something Michael hinted at, the drone shows a disproportionate influence on the temperament of his offspring. If a queen mates with 17 drones and one of them carries "hot" genetics, then the entire colony might be considered too aggressive.

    My suggestion would be to get your NWC's established and let them raise some drones. Then temporarily remove the queen from one of the NWC colonies. The bees will start several queen cells. This will give you a source of queen cells to re-queen the aggressive colonies. The NWC drones will increase the probability of getting gentle colonies from the new queens.

    Fusion

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    Aha...great advice guys, thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Darrington, WA, USA
    Posts
    544

    Default

    that wasnt a dumb question... I got a lot of info from the replys...

    Thank you Ford!

    JoeMcc

    Wow... I just noticed the date on that post...lol
    "Slow Down and Taste the Vanilla" - My Grandma

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Santa Rosa, California
    Posts
    86

    Default It really doesn't matter where you start...

    FordGuy,
    The place you start doing you selecting is after you see what the new Queen and her young bees are doing...The drone's (up to 15) deposit their sperm in sections, like pancakes, in the Queen's spermatheca... Over the coarse of her laying in a year, she may go through several different drones deposits of sperm... She does'nt have a sperm homoginizer, so last in, first out to the ovipositor... Don't get confused by some of the remarks....
    In the time frame of the Queen cell season the breeder Queen may only use up a small amount sperm, all from just one or two drones...
    Lee...

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