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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    how is this done? Do you just use a lot of the green plastic frames for drone frames?

    I am curious how this is set up.

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 05:55 PM: Message edited by: Chef Isaac ][/size]
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    If I took my favorite queen and used her for this instead of rearing her daughters, the goal would bee to saturate the area with Drones with desireable traits.

    All this time we've been concentrating on raising queen that would pass on the traits we wanted to keep and it could have been done with drones instead.

    I don't use plastic but I have a couple of drone frames with the top bar painted green. I use them for varroa trapping. Which is a show stopper here. If I were to allow the drones to hatch, I would also bee raising more varroa. Ain't gonna do that.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    How much does using drone foundation increase drone production? Does you drone trapping setup result in more total drones produced by the hive, or are the drones merely redistributed. I though I saw a post a while back stating that the drone production for the whole hive was not greatly influenced by the foundation cell size used in the whole hive.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    726

    Post

    I don't think they are greatly influence by drone foundation in the hive unless there is a good supply of pollen and nectar. Taber writes that in his observations drone populations aren't relative to the overal population but rather indicate the quantity and quality of food (especially pollen) that has been available.

    So what this means is that while giving the queen space for drone cells (either with a drone frame or drone cells distributed among the frames) they will raise more drones if they are feed well (either on a natural pollen flow or supplimented). Depending on your location there will be times of the year where feeding is necessary to produce a good drone population. Otherwise in a dearth you may have no drones or a very small drone population.

    I haven't done any formal observations, but what I've seen seems to match what Taber writes about drone production.

    -Tim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    726

    Post

    I should also note. I do have a few of those green drone frames. But what I typically do is just place a medium frame in a deep between other deep frames. They will draw out comb from the bottom of the frame and often it will be drone.

    -Tim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    I don't think it makes any difference. In my experience, and according to the research I've seen, the bees will raise the same number of drones no matter what you do.

    But if it makes you feel better put some drone foundation in (the green pierco frames or some wax drone foundation or some plastic drone foundation). If you're doing small cell you might even get by with some 7/11 from Walter T. Kelly for drones.

    But an empty frame will probably do it. If the bees only have worker foundation they will have an itch to build sone drone, so if you give them an empty frame they will usually draw a frame full of drone comb. AND the drone comb will be the size they want.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7

    Post

    I would recomend you have several drone combs and remove them and put them in a sacrafice hive. It would look like this. eleven hives with eleven drone combs. let the queen fill them up and cap them, remove them all and put all in one hive. then replace the 10 with new drone comb. you get twice as many drones in the area as you would with just one frame in each hive. The one hive with 10 frames of drone comb will not produce honey.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    953

    Post

    >All this time we've been concentrating on raising queen that would pass on the traits we wanted to keep and it could have been done with drones instead.

    Are there certain traits that are only passed on through drones?

    I don't know this to be true, but assume for instance that egg laying capability is only passed through the queens' genes and temperament is only passed through the drones' genes. If you were trying to select for temperament only, it wouldn't matter how gentle the stock was that you chose your queens from because the temperament of your new bees would only be decided by which drones your queens mated with.

    More simply, do you select drone colonies with a different set of traits then queen colonies?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    >Are there certain traits that are only passed on through drones?

    Some. Yes. I don't know how many traits are sex linked. But temperament seems to be one.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
    Posts
    474

    Post

    And how far from your mating hives should these "drone hives" should be located?
    And how is a hive of drones going to feed all these hungry boy's?Do they disperse after they mature,and if so,and IF they end up in your mating yard hives,and IF queen will TRY not to mate with the drones from her area,do you have an advantage?
    Thanks
    Mark

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    What I do is set a drone frame in the middle of each super. I use medium supers and each hive has three supers this gives me three frames of drones from my drone mother. I wait till the brood is being sealed and move them to another hive and replace them with more drone brood frames. I keep doing this till I have what I think is enough. Usually 2-3 rotations. For proper saturation it is recommended that in a three to four mile radius from your mating hives is where you should concentrate with your drones. I just use my back yard with 30 hive each having 3 frames of drone sure gives me lots of drones in the area. I also use some of these drones for AI use. I hope this helps you.
    A note though, this might cause some of your hives to have a large number of mites but then you can also breed the queens that show you low mite drops as breeder queens for your next generation of 'mite resistant' bees. You will have mites no mater what you do but this will also strengthen up your gene on mite resistance. Just my $0.02.
    Dan

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