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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I know I am getting a head of myself but I do that a lot. I suppose I need to learn how to graft first. he he he !!!

    I looked at some of the past post on incubators. Either you make them... which I have no skill at (hey... i make recipes... not incubators), buy them but so far, I have ran into the money issue because they are expensive...

    or go to the feed store and buy a chick incubator. I have seen some recomendations on this.

    will this work?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    You could just use a hive,protect the cells.If your just doing a few queens.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    i am curious to see if the chick incubator will work
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,139

    Post

    Some people have used chicken incubators. But chicken eggs can tolerate more variance in temperature. Some of the chicken icubators are fairly tight tolerances on temperature variations and some are not. The newer ones without the wafer type controls, I would guess, would be tighter tolerances. My old Monkey Wards one from the 1950's isn't that tight. It varies several degrees.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5

    Post

    I've used both waffer and newer circuit board controled and was very disappointed with the later. Even with circulation fan best I cound do was a +-3 degree temp change, usually worse. With the waffer and circulation fan I could maintain a +-1 degree change but fan is a must.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    what is the differance between a waafer and a circuit board control?

    Also... I am having a hard time finding an incubator at a resonable price.. under 100 dollars.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,139

    Post

    The wafer is a bi-metal system where two different metals expand and contract at different rates causing the switch to turn on and off. It is a physical/mechanical switch. The circut board is electronic. There is no physical switch involved. The metal can change over time. The electronics pretty much work or don't. The metal can have a variable amount of variance (difference between the low and high temps) where the circut board type have a specific amount of variance.

    Incubators are seldom reasonable. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    http://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/prod...incubator.html

    The one above is only $20

    http://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/cate...ors_parts.html

    Here are some more.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    722

    Post

    Think simple. All you need is a heat source, thermostat and a box (and maybe a fan). It could be as simple as a 60 watt bulb, wafer type thermostat, brushless fan from a dead PC, and a plastic cooler. You can get fancier with digital thermostats and fancy cases, but it isn't necessary.

    -Tim

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