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Thread: diversity

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Romney Marsh Kent England UK
    Posts
    292

    Post

    Hi,
    I’ve bought a 5 frame nuc which is a half sister to the queen that I all ready have (Heinz 57) and at the moment it is in my garden and it has been there for 4 to 5 week, I will movie them some time soon to my bee yard,

    This year when the bees raised a queen in a weak hive that I had she ended up failing and I think it could off been a lack of or partly due to diversity in my area, the nearest bees/bee keeper to me are 8 miles away and has a big problem with v mites.
    I bought a buckfast x cecropia queen to re queen my weak hive and that went wrong to,
    So I was thinking that if I took some broad from both hives next year and made up 2 nuc and bought 2 queens to head these nucs what stain off bee would be good to help on any queen rearing I might try to do next year,

    Thank Tony

    [size="1"][ November 26, 2005, 01:17 PM: Message edited by: tony350i ][/size]

  2. #2

    Post

    A weak hive most likely will raise a poor queen. Inbreeding is unlikely, Drones and queens from the same apiary tend to fly different distances to different drone congregation areas and avoid inbreeding. Inadequate fertilization is possible but there likely are feral colonies in the area.
    Conditions under which you raise queens are at least as important as their genetics.
    www.thebeeguy.blogspot.com.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Romney Marsh Kent England UK
    Posts
    292

    Post

    Ok want would you do if you were in my shoes,

    Lets say that I come out off winter next year with two strong hives for my first honey flow,
    One off these hives has a queen that I want to make some queens from,
    Do I make splits and let them raise there own queens and take a risk for the queens failing, which happened to me this year,
    Do I buy in two queens to head the splits I want to make and when they have some drones try and raise the queens?

    There is a colony off bees in the side wall of a corn barn that is about 1 mile away that have been there 3or 4 years but I don’t want to rely on this only colony for my queens to mate successfully, so bringing in two queens I thought would help with the queens that the bees raise when they go out and mate,

    (Inbreeding is unlikely; Drones and queens from the same apiary tend to fly different distances to different drone congregation areas and avoid inbreeding. Inadequate fertilization is possible but there likely are feral colonies in the area.)

    If this is true then I will have some problems getting a successfully mating, then maybe I should just buy in queens when I need them, but I do wont to make sister queens to a queen that has done really well for me,

    I want to go into the winter next year with six hives if I can and still have 200 + lb or more if possible off honey,

    Thank
    Tony

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Post

    Queens will fly as far as 10 km or more and I'll bet there are other bees somehwere in that range.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    Buying a new queen doesn't always mean you'll get a better queen then if you make a split and allow the queen to mate locally.

  6. #6

    Post

    I wouldn't worry about the unknown and uncontrolable variables. Most likely if you raise a dozen queens, some will do well and some won't. In your situation, I'd get a couple more queens and have more colonies before raising queens. That gives you more resources to start.
    This last spring I raised 7 queens and then split the queen rearing colony seven ways which no experienced beekeeper would recommend. Four colonies filled their hive with honey, three stayed small and weak. I know of no other colonies within 10 km, but am reasonably certain they exist. The year before I did someting similar and ended up with several queens with scattered brood patterns. Could have been poor fertilization or bad weather during mating time...
    www.thebeeguy.blogspot.com

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