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Thread: Elusive Queen

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Fort Bridger, Wyoming
    Posts
    17

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    I haven't been able to find the queen in my hive. I bought new ones and wanted to replace the ones I have. Problem, since I am out of time and still can't find one of the queens, is it possible to put a queen excluder between the top and bottom brood boxes keeping the queens apart for the winter? or will this cause conflict between the workers? Please reply asap as the temperatures are dropping rapidly at 6800 feet. Most days are 50-60 and nights are dropping to 20-30. I want to get them winterized quickly.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,361

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    Take your queen excluder and put it over an empty deep. Now shake all the bees off the frames onto the excluder slowly and smoke them gently to force them through. The queen will become obvious quickly. Pinch her until she goes (hawk are you listeneing) "POP" and then place the frames in the new box. After about 24 hrs. add the new queen. Wait 7 days and check for acceptance. Good Luck!

    [size="1"][ October 13, 2005, 10:09 PM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

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    Great job Joel, But MB suggest dropping her in a pint jar of alcohol. This alcohol then gets hew smell and after a while and a number of queens it can bee used for a swarm lure. I'll still call it pinching.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

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    I would only do that after she popped because I don't have the heart to watch her drown in alcohol. Speaking of which if you used Jack Daniels and then imbibed a bit, think how attractive we'd be to the bees. ( or would it be the other way?)

    [size="1"][ October 16, 2005, 10:04 AM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

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    They don't move much once they hit the alcohol.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

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    >>Wait 7 days and check for acceptance.

    Check for queen cells too, and get rid of them. After 7 days they should be well capped. If you dequeen a hive and give the bees 24 hours head start, they will start cells, if they can. I successfully introduced a queen in such a situation only to have her killed by a newly emerged virgin. Weather and other committments prevented me from getting in the hive in time.

    Live and learn.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Lockport, LA 70374 also on the new map
    Posts
    46

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    Revival of this thread here.

    If, and once the " old " queen is found, what could one do to keep her,alive, at least for awhile, to use for " oh, ah, gee, gee wizz, isn't THAT something, etc. In short as a teaching subject.

    Newb here.

    Thanks
    JB

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

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    I usually take the frame of brood she's on and a frame of honey and put them in a two frame nuc. I can always get rid of her later.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Lockport, LA 70374 also on the new map
    Posts
    46

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    I"m seriously considering an observation hive. Would that be a good place to keep an old queen?

    Furthermore I have found ample info on the building and setting up an observation hive but not much mention of the stocking with bees of same. Seems like the queen could be of use there, in lieu of a nuc?

    Seems like if the old queen is slow on the laying, then, that would be an asset to managing the observation hive, or am I wrong?


    Thanks
    JB

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    >I"m seriously considering an observation hive. Would that be a good place to keep an old queen?

    Sure.

    >Seems like if the old queen is slow on the laying, then, that would be an asset to managing the observation hive, or am I wrong?

    It's probably irelevant. Unless she's failing altogether the controling factor in the amount of brood they rear is the worker's willingness to raise it. They either fill the cells with honey to keep the queen from laying in them or they remove the eggs if they don't want to rear them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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