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Thread: royal jelly

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    orange county, california
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    46

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    hi all:
    I was wondering if any one has experience and know how with royal jelly? i.e. raising queen cells, harvesting , and storage of jelly.
    what the easiest and more productive method of doing it?
    any info will be greatly appreciated

    thanks,
    mike
    It's like a book, I think, this bloomin' world, Which you can read and care for just so long, But presently you feel that you will die, Unless you get the page you're readin' done, an' turn another - likely not so good; But what you're after is to turn 'em all.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
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    That's a real general question. What part don't you already know? I know.

    You probably want to dehydrate it and store and sell it as a powder. Did you know that part? The rest is what you'd assume. Just like raising queens. Graft. Let the bees fill the cell with RJ. Wait til you can see the larvae so you can remove it. Then scoop out all the RJ. Complain about the small harvest for the amount of work.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    orange county, california
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    46

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    hi Robert:
    thanks for your reply. no I did not know that you can dehydrate RJ. when I posted my question, I absolutely had no clue that RJ can be harvested until my new sister in law asked me for some. I was stumped, and too it was late in the season . so I promised her I'd make her some (hopefully) next spring.
    so the only info I know is what you already mentioned . i.e. grafting cells and prior to cell closing extract the RJ.
    I was told to freeze it once I harvest it. I think that would be difficult since every time it needed to be used it would have to be defrosted. I like your idea of dehydration. do I use veggie dehydrator? I have one, but wont the hot air effect color or smell?

    I appreciate your help & time
    thanks
    It's like a book, I think, this bloomin' world, Which you can read and care for just so long, But presently you feel that you will die, Unless you get the page you're readin' done, an' turn another - likely not so good; But what you're after is to turn 'em all.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,331

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    Get a very small jar and scoop it out of the cells into the jar with a very small "spatula" or a flat stick about 1/8" or 3/16". Put the jar in the freezer and next time take the jar back out and scoop some more in.

    If you don't freeze it it will change from white and "creamy" to brown and "jelly".

    I don't know that the change hurts the nutrition or not. I used to do this to collect it for grafting queens until I decided it really didn't help that much and was too much work.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
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    May 2005
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    Colorado
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    Sorry Mav, I don't know how to dehydrate it. I just know it's normally sold as a powder. And it's a whole lot of work for a very little bit of Royal Jelly. Ain't there a OC BK Assoc?

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Placerville, CA
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    6

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    I don't know anything about dehydrating RJ but if you want to collect a "quanity" of jelly, if you can call it that, is to use the jelly from swarm cells. Scoop it out as Michael suggests or you can cut the swarm cells out and squeeze it like a tube of toothpaste into a container. I keep it in a container the size of a film canister. Keep it frozen as it seems to spoil quickly. It seems to have a long shelf life if kept frozen. On a side note the local health food store here sells the jelly for about $15 an oz.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    My understanding is that royal jelly collected commercially in China is done within the first few days of queen larval development. Initial feedings to new queen larvae are derived mostly from the mandibular glands of nurse bees. After three days the feedings change to a 1:1 ratio of mandibular gland secretions and hypophryngeal gland secretions.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
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    Michael,

    How did you you use the frozen Jelly, did you have to use it all at once or could you thaw it and use some then refreeze?

    Thanks
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    &gt;How did you you use the frozen Jelly, did you have to use it all at once or could you thaw it and use some then refreeze?

    I only froze it for the long term. When I was in the middle of queen rearing I was putting it in the fridge in between and warming to room temps and using it for the grafts. I don't think it helped, so I stopped doing it. But I had a very small container to start with. What do you want to do with it? I'd put it in small enough containers to serve your purpose.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
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    I was thinking of using for queen rearing adding to grafting cells. But it sounds like you did not see any real advantage?
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    No. I don't think it makes any difference. I tried using it and not using it. Then again, I was using a Jenter and all the royal jelly in the cup goes with the larvae. Dolittle was the first to suggest adding the Royal Jelly when grafting and Jay smith concurred in his first book but changed his mind by the second book. Smith concluded that the bees just removed the old royal jelly he added anyway and he got no better acceptance nor better queens by using it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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