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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Question

    Anybody use this on a regular basis? How well does it work, and what are the management considerations?

    Would like to raise my own queens at some point. Is it too late this year to try this? [img]smile.gif[/img] Thanks.


    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    >Anybody use this on a regular basis?

    No, I use the jenter but have tried it.

    >How well does it work

    Very well.

    >and what are the management considerations?

    The same as any queen rearing. You need lots of bees to do a good job of rearing lots of queens.

    >Would like to raise my own queens at some point. Is it too late this year to try this?

    I'd say you've got a couple of weeks left. Remember it's about a month until you have a laying queen, so you're running out of time quickly. If you want to do it, then I'd do it now.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Post

    Thanks MB, I'll get going on that tomorrow, as I have a pesky Buckfast hive to requeen.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    233

    Post

    remember to feed and feed and feed [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I used the Hopkins method for about 6 years then I learned how to graft. With grafting I did get a better preforming and larger queen. I have been grafting now for 3 years.
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Post

    What kind of queens did you get using the Hopkins method? Didn't they lay well, or were they just avarage queens?

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I think you can get just as good of a queen with the Hopkins method IF you build a #5 hardware cloth cage to put the queen on the comb four days before you turn it horizontal so you KNOW the age of the larvae.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    I tried it once this summer but no luck I really dont know what went wrong.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I have only tried it on Italian 3 banded and I confined the queen on the comb with divider screen in the hive so she could only use one frame.
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    Using the Hopkins method does not automatcially resolve the main issues of queen rearing. These you have to take care of the same in any method. It only saves grafting.

    In any method you need to:

    o Make sure of the age of the Larvae. You can LEARN to do this by eye, but if you haven't learned that, then using some kind of restriction on the queen is helpful so that you KNOW the age of the larvae.

    o Lots of bees. Bursting with bees. Overflowing with bees. If you have a lot of bees you will resolve most of the problems you have with them no building cells.

    o Lots of food ESPECIALLY lots of pollen. Two frames full of pollen near the cells is nice. You can't get good queens without an abundance of food for the nurse bees.

    o Good timing. If you're late removing the cells, if you're late or early turning the comb on it's side or you don't set up your mating nucs the day before you put the cells in or you don't make the swarm box queenless at least two hours before or you you don't make your cell starter (if it's NOT a swarm box) queenless at least 12 hours before and not more than 24 hours before etc. etc. etc. These things make the difference between success and failure no matter what your methods.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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