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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada, North of the 50th Parallel
    Posts
    217

    Post

    Hi!
    I'm trying to raise my own queens with the Jenter System (first time, I know it's late in the season)
    The queen is caged on the jenter frame and lays the eggs (this part is ok)
    The problem occurs when the eggs are supposed to hatch, that same day I checked and the eggs were gone. This has happened twice already. Any input on what might be causing this. (The hive seems to have a bit of chalkbrood)
    Happiness comes from within

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    First pick a different hive that has better restiance to chalkbrood. Second, after reading the directions with the Jenter System, you are to place the frame containing the Jenter comb box between other frames that contain eggs, or the bees might remove the eggs and move them somewhere else where there are eggs. Keeps the brood together.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Just throwing this out in case you haven't thought about it.
    When you go an check to see if the eggs hatched
    is there any thing in the cell? Is it wet looking at the bottom?

    I thought the bees were cleaning them out too but then I was shown just how small and transparent newly hatch larve are. If the is a wetness to the bottom of the cell then there probably is a larve in there. (And the perfect age I might add!)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    @Jonathan Hofer

    I'm trying to raise my own queens with the Jenter System (first time, I know it's late in the season)

    I would say in your region (Kanada) it is to late for breeding new queens this year. It takes 17 day for the queen to hatch and approx 5 more days before she is ready for the first mating flight. This would be the first week in September and I’m almost sure that there are no drones available anymore.

    You’re product would be a drone-laying queen.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    Depends on when you start getting frosts. As long as the weather is warm enough, you should be ok, at least for one run anyways.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada, North of the 50th Parallel
    Posts
    217

    Post

    Thanks people, hopefully It will work.
    The hives don't start cleaning out the drones here until mid October
    Happiness comes from within

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    19

    Post

    Hi Jonathan:
    Actually, I have no idea what the problem is, maybe I should come over and see for myself how that kit works, but anyway my suggetion is to leave 'em alone. Realease the Queen then ignore that hive till the larava are old enough to remove. Bees seem to get along just fine without us. Once you're figured it out, let me in on the secret [img]smile.gif[/img] .
    Lance W.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    You need a strong hive so they will raise the brood. If they don't want that much brood they will clean out the eggs. You also need it in the middle of the brood nest, preferably with open brood next to it. As mentioned, make sure they are empty. hatched ones are hard to see without removing it and looking VERY close. A newly hatched larvae is even harder to see than an egg.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Post

    My early experience was like yours. I was so scared my larvae might possibly too old, that I was giving cups with eggs to my queenless unit. They either ate the eggs or put them somewhere else. After three or four attempts, I finally figured out they wanted larvae, not eggs, and yes, they are very difficult to see in that first day state. A "wetness" is the sign.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

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