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Thread: Coupelarvae

  1. #41
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    Mar 2005
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    Conway, AR
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    When I built the FWOF, I forgot I got the design from an article in the December 1993 issue of Bee Culture. I found my drawing where I had recorded the original source. Bee Culture called it a Cell Door.
    http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group...ase.yahoo.com/
    Jon
    Jon, N6VC/5

  2. #42
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    Wetumpka ,Alabama
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    question for Michael.I new to this so this may sound stupid but I need to know,haha

    2) Transfering the larvae with a maximum of royal jelly left and without damaging the larvae.

    Ok you made this statemnet but I need to know if you add the royal jelly as you do when your grafting or do the bees do it for you?Also if you add it ,at what stage do you add it ,just before the starter hive or just after the eggs hatch?
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  3. #43
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    Here is a description of getting the cupularve ready for the queen's use.
    It was written several years ago by a Belgium beekeeper named Luc Noel. lnoel@arcadis.be
    Luc says, "There is a difficulty using the cupularve for the first time. The bees must build a comb from the wax coated on the plastic fondation. Lot of beekeepers don't luck with that. If the bees clean the wax, it is possible to replace the wax resource with a brush and liquid wax. Best is to give the box to a extanding colony having wax fondations to handle. As the box have to be fixed into a frame, you can place wax foundation around the box. The box's comb will be build in the same time that the foundation".
    Jon
    Jon, N6VC/5

  4. #44
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    &gt;question for Michael.I new to this so this may sound stupid but I need to know,haha
    &gt;&gt;2) Transfering the larvae with a maximum of royal jelly left and without damaging the larvae.
    &gt;Ok you made this statemnet but I need to know if you add the royal jelly as you do when your grafting or do the bees do it for you?

    The bees have already put the royal jelly there and since you are transfering the larvae with the bottom of the cell, you get all the royal jelly with the larve.

    &gt;Also if you add it

    I don't. I HAVE tried it, but haven't seen any difference.

    &gt;at what stage do you add it ,just before the starter hive or just after the eggs hatch?

    WHEN I tried it it was at the time of the transfer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #45
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    Ok an off the wall question here.
    Does anyone make a small cell queen rearing kit? Have not measured mine to see if it was or not.
    Just got it from Better Bee.
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  6. #46
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    Cupularve cell size measured flat to flat is 0.206".
    Regular deep foundation from Kelly's is 0.180".
    Jon, N6VC/5

  7. #47
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    Michael,
    When I took the cover off my cupularve, I discovered that I had drilled the frame in two places and inserted two nails in the two holes, cutoff so they were flush inside the plastic. I didn't remember doing this, but there are a lot of things I don't remember anymore.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  8. #48
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    The size of the cup is probably the issue, if there is one, for small cell queens. I wax coat the cups to make them smaller and get better acceptance and to reuse them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #49
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    Michael,
    I found my hair curler cages. Along with those I also found my original Nocot instructions. The really useful information is in French. One illustration shows the shape of the cell cup after it is prepared for the queen to lay in, and you're right. The bees close it up at an angle with wax. I wouldn't have noticed it, if you hadn't mentioned putting wax in them to make them smaller.
    I put my cupularve in a hive to pull out the frame. I removed the dowels so the frame looks normal except for the cupularve in the center.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  10. #50
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    Feb 2004
    Location
    Upstate SC
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    OK . . . with the Nicot system, what do you do with the cell cups that you do not use to make queens? There are 110 of them - I might only pull 20 cups. Can I wash them out and start over?

  11. #51
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    Leave it in the hive after you pull the cups you want to start queens with ,remove the queen,replace the excluder,those that are left will hatch out and go about their duties,then the cell will be filled with honey.The next time you want queens pull it out and place the queen back in,replace the excluder and the workers will empty the cells of honey for the queen to lay in.It's always ready.You will have to replace the cups in the back after you pull them off for queen raising.
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  12. #52
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    Feb 2004
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    Thanks King Bee - but . . . what if I don't want to wait that long? I'm thinking about poping it into another hive using a different queen. I'd like to recycle quickly. Ideas??

  13. #53
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    &gt;Can I wash them out and start over?

    I pull the cell plugs with larvae and eggs that I didn't use and wait for them to dry. Next time I put them in a day or so ahead so the bees can clean them out.

    But then I'm usually running cycles of queens and I leave the Jenter in all the time, so the next time I'm putting it back in after the last graft and three days before the next time I put the queen in.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #54
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    Aug 2003
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
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    &gt;I will ask this question a second time. Does anyone use those little plastic mating nucs?

    These are very popular here in Norway. We have a very short season for Queen-rearing, and want to use as little resources as possible as not to inflict the honey-harvest.

    These small plastic-nuc do demand less resources beewise - only need 1,5 dl of bees, and can be used for queen-cell after queen-cell througout the short season.

    When a queen is found laying, she will be harvested, and a new, ready cell introduced.

    Queens are most populary introduced here either by a bigger cage placed directly on a frame with brood ready to emerge, or in small nucs combines with the newpaper-method to a hive that is queenless/queen removed.

  15. #55
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    Feb 2004
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    Upstate SC
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    OK . . . so the queen lays up the cell cups in the Nicot box, I remove her and wait 3 days for the eggs to hatch - then put the cell cups on the cell bar and put in the starter hive. But the stinking bees keep cleaning out the eggs before they hatch. Twice now! I even put the box in the "likely been queenless too long, but no laying worker yet" starter hive - thinking they might be safe to hatch there . . . but no!!! So - what's up with these stinking bees??? I'm about ready to just start grafting!

  16. #56

    Post

    Frank Wyatt

    Frank I'm glad you got a copy on instruction on jenter. hope you could send me one too... my email is khernaez@yahoo.com.

    Got a graftless kit from betterbee... hope the jenter instruciton would fit in to use the one i have. thank so much.

  17. #57

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    Taliesin

    I used a similar nucs you mentioned made of wood i made myself. i think the name is kirchain mini nuc. I like it because i dont waste a lot of bees during mating stage of queen.. disadvantage is their prone to being robbed by strong colonies so i have toset it up far from my productive hives...

  18. #58

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    n2dsky

    ...have you tried inserting the cups into the starter nucs AFTER the eggs are hatched while still on the breeding hive.. i mean in its forth day after the eggs are layed so that it has a larva in it rather than an egg???

  19. #59
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    &gt;so the queen lays up the cell cups in the Nicot box, I remove her and wait 3 days for the eggs to hatch - then put the cell cups on the cell bar and put in the starter hive. But the stinking bees keep cleaning out the eggs before they hatch.

    Did you wait for them to hatch or not? I'm not clear. If you waited for them to hatch that would be the fourth day from when you confined the queen. If you put the cell cups on a cell bar BEFORE they hatch the bees will always clean them out before they hatch.

    You need a strong colony (doesn't have to be big, but needs a good density of bees) with the confined queen and then the box so they will hatch them. A hive that doesn't have enough bees may clean them out because they don't want more brood. Then once the eggs have hatched in the box then you transfer the larvae (not the eggs) to the cups and to the cell bars. Then the cell starter needs to be overflowing with bees. Like you can't fit any more bees in the box. It also needs open nectar and pollen. This can be any size box from a five frame nuc to a ten frame box, but it needs to be overflowing with bees and preferably queenless at least two hours, but I like overnight. This will be the same regardless of if you use a graftless system or if you graft. The timing of transfering larvae is the same. The requirements for a cell builder are the same. The bigger box will be able to start more cells than the smaller box but both will make good queens if you have enough bees and enough food available.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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