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  1. #1

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    How many of you would be interested in exchanging daughters from your best breeders? I've been med. free for three years and although I take a hit here and there with losses, my breeders only come from "boomers" in the spring. I live in Southern Lower Michigan and this will be my fifth year rearing queens.

    As many of you have already experienced, the Italians do tend to darken over the years as we have been getting away from some of the commercial (and perhaps, more unstable) lines.


    I'd be interested in an exchange with MED. FREE(Important: MED. FREE) breeders to help diversify my populations. Did I mention MED. FREE? [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Let me know via this post, just incase my spam filter boots your email.

    Regards,

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,162

    Post

    Jim, I would be interested. I have several breeders from untreated colonies, that I call survivor queens, and they are what you described as "boomers" this Jan, ready for the almonds. Several of them were used as breederstock last year, and their daughters perfomance are exceptional. I do have a new breeder queen that I am very excited about this year, her only drawback seem to be heavy propolis use, but in all other regards seems nearly bullet proof. She has surrvived heavy natural selection pressure and continues to out perform everything I have come across lately.
    Thank you for your kind remarks; lets build some better bees!
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Maybe propolis is related to survival? Or maybe it's a trait the survivor feral stock has. I don't see it as a down side if they are survivors.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

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    what is your definition of boomers?

  5. #5

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    >>what is your definition of boomers?


    I know it's a relative term, but I'm looking for a colony that has proven successful the season before in terms of honey production and rapid build up the following spring.

    Winter cluster size is also considered, in my opinion, since that helps contribute to an early population explosion. Typically, a colony that could be split at least three ways (in January...in Michigan, which I know is impossible with our conditions at that time of the season) is a candidate.


    Regards,

    Jim

  6. #6

    Post

    I would like more info on your ideas. I am pesticide free since 1993 and have some ferrel and russian plus NWC"s from good breeders. e mail me at
    beekeeper4u2@wmconnect.com
    Don
    %Dixie Bee Supply

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    David,James and all
    Some examples of "Boomers"

    http://tinyurl.com/44udz


    Album "Boomer hive'
    BOB

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Hey Bob

    Your photo link doesn't work, you need to edit it so others can read/see them. Follow the directions on the site and you can modify the settings so either the public or people witha password can see them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    HEY Bob, nice pictures, now that is a BOOMER!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    Great pictures, Bob!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    I do not use any meds and I do at times loose as much as 50%. I then AI my queens with the survivor stock. I have NWC. In my breeding plans I do allow a few hives to open mate just so that I can keep some gean diversity in my group as well as buying some queens for drone production.
    I breed for rapid build up and low use of stores with resistance to diseases.
    Dan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I am interested as well. My queens are Italian/Carniolian/SMR fourth generation. This will be my 3rd year since I started all over. I breed for rapid buildup too. I think to anybody in the north that is important. I also choose the late flyers, (meaning cooloer temps) to add in the mix. I have been on small cell for 2 complete years, entering into year 3. Mite counts still are relatively low, and I am very satisfied. My bees wintered well so far. Saw the hive with all the nucs in it active this past weekend. (temp around 47). I would be interested in getting virgin queens though.
    Dale Richards<br />Dal-Col Apiaries<br />

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    Bob, those are some impressive pic's, on the first pic, I see what you mean by BOOMER, MORE LIKE A EXPLOSION
    Ted

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