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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    The Ohio Queen Breeders web site has a picture of a cell finisher frame with comb both above and below the cell bar.

    Ohio Queen Breeders Raising Queens page

    Any ideas how to build this, if it is effective, and how you keep the surrounding comb full of sealed brood?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    DAVID a friend of mine has this type of cell bars, his just slides in from the front tight and then he put a staple in front to keep it from coming out that way when the cells are sealed he can pull the staples and put in a incubator, if you look at it close it has spacer's bars (up&down) on each side that doesn't fill the empty space between the 2 middle frame bars so the thickness of the cell bar will slide in snug, I have never seen any brood in his, he said he thinks the bee's just take to the cells better, but all in all he says his father use this technique and he does to. thats all i know about it. I'll get one and take some measurement's. all i know is its a standard frame with standard foundation with the middle cut out of the foundation and bottom piece's of frame cut to fit in between the frames sides and nailed. hope some of this helps.
    Ted

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I don't just because I do them in mediums and two bars is all I can fit in it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I copied what they (Ohio Queen Breeders) did by just nailing two pieces of wood to a wood frame. Just use one nail so that the pieces can swivel- this will come in handy when you remove the cell cups.

    I closed up the area where the cell cups go using thin plywood, and let a hive wax in the rest. Then, right before you use it as a cell builder, put it in another hive so the queen will lay eggs in it and then it's ready to put your queen cups in.

    I like this setup since it gives the nurse bees a reason to be on the frame, and plenty of access to the queen cells.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I'm sure it's a nice idea. It's why I put open brood on both sides of the cell bar frame.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    I just use a shallow frame and graft on the bottom bar or wire a bar onto it.I don't like the way thats set up because the bees could secure that bar onto the frame with wax or something and it might make it hard to pull out.

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