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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I have a single hive at one site. No other bees that I know of within the area. I wanted to move this hive earlier but it has three supers on it. Now thinking perhaps this early fall.
    My question is that if the queen has to be replaced, is there a problem with in-breeding if they do this themselves? Should I move the hive now since I do not get to look at them often and things sometimes happen rather fast?
    Thank-You.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Post

    >I have a single hive at one site. No other bees that I know of within the area. I wanted to move this hive earlier but it has three supers on it. Now thinking perhaps this early fall.

    How far did you want to move it? What equipment do you have available for moving it? If it's more than a few hundred yards, I would just go out in the afternoon, and park your pickup or trailer next to the hive and load them a box at a time. Then nail it together and strap it together and tie it in so it won't tip. After the bees settle down for the night, close it up and drive to the new location and park. If it's a trailer, unload it, if it's your pickup, have someone take you home. Combe back in the morning and open the hive up and then move all of the boxes one at a time onto the ground. You now have moved your hive and all of your bees and never had to lift but one box at a time.

    >My question is that if the queen has to be replaced, is there a problem with in-breeding if they do this themselves?

    There can be. Here's an interesting perspective on that subject: http://www.beeworks.com/slow_hives.htm

    >Should I move the hive now since I do not get to look at them often and things sometimes happen rather fast?

    If you want it moved, I would move it now. If you don't care, then take your time.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    You wrote:
    I have a single hive at one site. No other bees that I know of within the area. I wanted to move this hive earlier but it has three supers on it. Now thinking perhaps this early fall.

    Reply:
    Early fall would be better as the active season would be over and you would not disrupt them so much and with the crop over it could be stripped down and moved quite easily in the early evening after dark.

    You Then wrote:
    My question is that if the queen has to be replaced, is there a problem with in-breeding if they do this themselves?

    Reply:
    NO! Very few places on earth are actually devoid of bees should one really look around (counting ferals and all, not just colonies beekeepers keep.)

    You Finished:
    Should I move the hive now since I do not get to look at them often and things sometimes happen rather fast?

    Reply:
    That is your choice, but active season tends to complicate things and could mean you stop colony growth for a while by movement. This is your choice though as to time of year, but better for bees in fall, just after summer activity stops and just before fall flows start.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Post

    There was a time a few years ago when the mites first hit that I saw no feral bees. I think that time has now passed. I see at least some bees everywhere. The only feral ones around here now, are those little black ones. I'd love to have some (or all) of those genetics in my hive.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Michael wrote:
    There was a time a few years ago when the mites first hit that I saw no feral bees. I think that time has now passed. I see at least some bees everywhere. The only feral ones around here now, are those little black ones. I'd love to have some (or all) of those genetics in my hive.

    Reply:
    For temperate zones small black bees of natural size have mating dominance over yellower ones that favor tropical zones. In transition zones where black meet yellow (like mediterranean area or southern USA by their latitudes) both do quite well and good simple hybrids are obtained. YOu never really lose full black nor full yellow traits, and in opposite zones some characteristics switch!

    For good honey production, might want a simple hybrid instead, but natural sized and acclimitized to your area. Small black would work, but don't get too upset if a slight amount of yellow mixed in. That's just natural in a way you know.

    But those small black bees of the hills and northern latitudes sure are intruging and something to have. Need the traits for good winter carryover, staying put, production, etc.

    Best regards,

    Dee

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