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Thread: Age ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

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    Can someone tell me In what stage of her life is the new queen when the old queen swarm's? I won't think it has already hatched because the 2 would fight.or would they?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,399

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    I haven't seen a lot written on this. From my experience and listening to other's observations, the bees often swarm when there are queen cells that are capped but no queen has hatched. Sometimes there or several afterswarms with virgin queens leading them. Often the original hive miscalculates and ends up with no queen because they have all left in afterswarms. Sometimes the first queen kills the rest, normal if she intends to stay, but if she's planning on swarming she will leave the other queen cells to hatch and she swarms. The problems arise when either all the queens, after hatching, swarm, or the last one doesn't hatch.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Can someone tell me In what stage of her life is the new queen when the old queen swarm's? I won't think it has already hatched because the 2 would fight.or would they?

    Reply:
    We work our bees on a natural system of beekeeping with small cell foundation.

    Many times our queens don't swarm and we end up with a mother/daughter queen situation with both laying in our colonies, with the old queen finally fading away. This happens a lot, but mainly in the fall and early spring.

    Other times when the force is small the new queen emerges and simply kills the old queen off and still no swarming happens. This normally follows during drought or during poor to average years when the bees seem to know they cannot make reproductive increase.

    On good years when queens swarm IMPOV from years of observation the new queen is either newly mated when the old queen swarms or in the act of mating (as mating flights are several often times until enough drones are found). The bees seem to know that the old queen pulls back and stops laying and slims down to fly, while the younger one is getting ready to come-on and lay, and so make preparations for the broodnest changeover and restart.

    Swarm cell queens are at various ages and can be noted by looking for the different age of the cells.

    Supercedure cells are normally at about the same age. Because of this you can get the normal queen fighting going during supercedure rather then normal swarming. But also normally there are less supercedure cells available.

    Now in man's colonies things can be different and queen cells can be triggered by monthly inspections by frames inserted back into hives backwards, breaking normal Housel positioning.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

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