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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    I am purchasing some hives from survivor feral stock. They are from several hundred miles from here. I was hoping to breed my own queens. I have survivor feral bees around my bee yards that live somewhere near. My two bee yards are about 60 miles apart. Both have feral bees around.

    My question is, can I just expect there to be drones of sufficient numbers from the feral hives and can I expect the genetics to be good on the feral hives to raise my own queens with the feral stock from 600 miles away as the Queen stock and do open mating without raising drones myself?

    Also, how many times can I do this before I start needing some outbreeding? I figure after a few generations, I can swap some of the hives with the other beeyard for some outside genetics.

    Any suggestions are welcome.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    My question is, can I just expect there to be drones of sufficient numbers from the feral hives and can I expect the genetics to be good on the feral hives to raise my own queens with the feral stock from 600 miles away as the Queen stock and do open mating without raising drones myself?

    Obviously this is not Dee. If you are "importing" wild bees, then they survived from somewhere. I think you need to concentrate on the larvae of those bees, and let your "home feral drones" do the rest. If it were me, and I probably will do this, I would look for a local swarm, graft larvae from that queen, and then mate locally again. It sounds like inbreeding, but I am willing to believe there are many feral colonies around yet, and of good stock, and most importantly, adapted to your climate, food sources ect. These are the bees I want to develop. They are native survivors. As Dee once said, the importing of different bees, may very well be the road to varroa hell. (at least I think she said that!).
    Either way, you are getting survivors from the same basic climate. As far as food sources, who knows. I'm sure they will adapt, and if you regress them, (your probable intention), and fog the first year, you should be on your way. Keep us posted, as I will do as well. Survivor queen breeding is where it is at for me, and I intend to pursue it deeply this year..
    Once again, just a thought............


    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    The feral bees around here seem to have a hard time and a very low survival rate.It might help if you check in the early spring to see if there are any bees around.Ive found if I heat up some comb honey over a heat source the scent will attract them from a long ways and you can feed any bees that come in to see how many hives there might be.I think you'll be very happy with the results of crossing your queens with feral drones.I know this question was for Dee just trying to help.Good Luck

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