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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wichita Kansas
    Posts
    99

    Default Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    I used the Cloake board method last year with good success by grafting and adding the grafts to the top box. I've read that one can also do it by introducing a frame of eggs and letting the bees do their thing. If you've tried doing the latter, typically how many queen cells do the bees make? I introduce 15 when I graft and they seem to handle that fine. Just wondering how many I would get if I left it up to the bees.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Casey, Il, USA
    Posts
    2,525

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    I plan on trying it combined with the OTS system this yr. I will post how it works out if I'm able to do it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,593

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    My son uses the Cloake board to start cells using the Hopkins method. Really it is just a method of making part of a hive queenless so they will start cells. Manipulating the entrances will crowd the upper box and concentrate nurse bees. According to Snelgrove the more crowded and high percentage nurse bees, the more it is like swarm conditions and the bees will start more cells than if they think it as supercedure. According to him, feed the upper box a day ahead even if there is some flow.
    Frank

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,417

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    They will make up to 12 cells if you let them to. But this is not a definite number so depends on
    the number of nurse bees that are willing to make the cells. Many times the cells they made will
    stick together next to each others. Cutting them out is not that easy without killing the other
    cell. And the comb will have holes in it if you want to reuse the comb again after the cells got
    cut out. Maybe to use a comb frame that you don't want to reuse again as they will not repair the holes.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wichita Kansas
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    i think i'll stick to grafting. thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,417

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    Actually, grafting is not that hard to do. I use a small miner's bright LED light to look
    into the cells to find the right age larvae. When I find one with the right age, I scoop the larva out of the cell with a small metal 30 shaped
    stiff wire that has a small hook at the end of it. Then transfer the larva into the cell cup and start another one again. The whole process takes
    less than 3 minutes to complete.
    I don't cut the comb just lay the frame of bees with the young larvae on top of the open hive will do. I sat next to the
    hive on a 5 gal bucket to do my grafting. The finished graft in the cups can bee transferred to the cell starter in the same yard. If you find a better process then
    do share it here.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Buderim, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: Queen rearing with the Cloake board

    I think Harry Cloake was a New Zealander. His method has been used right across the world.

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