Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 105
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Darlingford, Manitoba
    Posts
    17

    Post

    Do Honey bees in the USA collect pollen from Maize (Corn)?

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,555

    Post

    >>>Do Honey bees in the USA collect pollen from Maize (Corn)?<<<

    Yes

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Appleton, NY
    Posts
    39

    Post

    >>>Do Honey bees in the USA collect pollen from Maize (Corn)?<<<

    especially last year !

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Post

    Some types of field corn. Some types of sweet corn also.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Darlingford, Manitoba
    Posts
    17

    Post

    http://www.bayercropscience.com/baye...256D2C0041FB32
    http://www.chinese-pesticide.com/ins...idacloprid.htm

    Ok,
    Those of you who can read French would possibly find it to their advantage in sourcing past information and research results on Systemic insectides
    Try: Apiservices.com
    There is alot in English.
    Be warned, there is enough material to spend several weeks of your time catching up on this story.
    It is not clear cut and the information should be properly digested to ensure that bias is eliminated as far as possible

    a little like the Oxalic treatment story - the work was done and is still being done in other countries than the US - suprised!

    If systemics are (note that I say if!), then much misery may possibly have been avoided if previous warning that were given were taken up.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Darlingford, Manitoba
    Posts
    17

    Post

    This post corrects silly mistakes found in previous copy http://www.bayercropscience.com/baye...256D2C0041FB32
    http://www.chinese-pesticide.com/ins...idacloprid.htm

    Ok,
    Those of you who can read French would possibly find it to their advantage in sourcing past information and research results on Systemic insectides
    Try: Apiservices.com
    There is alot in English.
    Be warned, there is enough material to spend several weeks of your time catching up on this story.
    It is not clear cut and the information should be properly digested to ensure that bias is eliminated as far as possible

    a little like the Oxalic treatment story - the work was done and is still being done in other countries than the US - suprised!

    If systemics are (note that I say if!)implicated , then much misery may possibly have been avoided if previous warnings that were given were taken up.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,497

    Post

    >Some types of sweet corn also.

    Does anyone remember micro-encapsulated Pencap-M? Sprayed on sweet corn was deadly to honeybee colonies. They take the capsules home, like pollen grains.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Post

    Only use on large commercial outfits & I do not believe it is any longer legal for sweet corn use. If bees come in contact with this stuff the entire hive will die out very fast & you will have boxes full of dead bees. I know , had it happen a time or to in 30 years.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Jerry Bromenshenk posted to Bee-L yesterday and to date it doesn't appear as though the CCD working group of which he is a member has reached a consensus about the cause of CCD. He mentioned a lot of possibilities, but no certainties.

    This systemic pesticide theory may just be someone's pet theory. Doesn't mean it isn't true. Doesn't mean it is. I for one am hoping Jim had a chance to talk to people at Penn State today and will have something to report.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    I know I am setting on the edge of my chair brother george. come on Jim, tell us what ya' know bro.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > come on Jim, tell us what ya' know bro

    I don't know anything more than what is being
    posted to Bee-L, the Penn State website, and
    so on. I intend to stay the heck out of the
    way, and let people do their work. If they
    find anything specific or significant, they
    certainly will post their musings and findings,
    so we don't need to waste their time bugging
    them for more frequent updates.

    One of the most annoying types of boss is one
    that expects more frequent updates
    when a project is behind schedule due to an
    unforeseen problem, as this takes resources
    away from addressing the actual problem itself.

    So, I'm gonna sit back and wait, and I would
    suggest that we all do the same. I can assure
    you that nothing is being kept in private, and
    that everyone will be informed at the same time.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Just glanced at the NY Times, and noticed
    a front-page story on CCD.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/27/business/27bees.html

    Nothing new, but it is nice to see the problem being
    considered "news" by the paper of record.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    I just heard there's going to be a piece about it on The CBS Morning Show in a few minutes
    It will probably be on their website by this afternoon
    sure is getting a lot of press

    Dave

  14. #74
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    chilliwack, bc
    Posts
    641

    Post

    Pembinabee

    yes, I filled out a survey that i found on the Canadian Honey Council website. i have yet to talk to the provincial apiariest.

    it seems quit a few beeks have suffered the same thing up here in Canada. the funny thing is that i know of 3 neighboring beeks around me hows hives are doing well and haven't had anywhere near the type of losses i had. very strange indeed. will it be there turn next year? will i be wiped out next year? who's to say?

    concerning the link to the interveiw with Dave H. that loggermike put on page 2 here, the part about the impact of pollenation i think is going to be worse then expected because we're only talking about the honey bee's part of the pollenation. if these chems are effecting honey bees, how are they effecting bumblebees, wasps, leaf cutter bees, mason bees and even butterflies. if we had none of the above along with no honeybees, well, I guess growers are going to be heading out to their crops with feather in hand to pollinate their blooms. i think if these insects disapeared to an all time low number, food shortages will be a very real thing.
    Will Gruenwald Chilliwack BC

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,309

    Post

    Sometimes we need to stop and look at the big picture. While we know that the losses suffered are catastrophic for the beekeepers involved, as jlyon pointed out on another thread a million hives managed to show up for almond pollination.

    I had a 20% loss over winter (mites, poor summer pasture, some bad queens-the usual stuff)but still had enough good hives to meet my pollination commitments. I think this is probably more typical for beekeeps than the 60 or 80% losses.(I dont want to downplay the losses-I couldn't survive an 80%loss )

    So unless this is something new that keeps spreading,there should be enough hives to meet demand. On the other hand if it turns out to be a new disease that is unstoppable, we are in BIG trouble.

    The unbelievable amount of news coverage is a good thing for making people aware that we are doing something important. But even better is the fact that so many talented researchers are working on this. Even if CCD remains a mystery, a lot of good info is going to come out of all this research.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Just to show you that I care:
    Neonicitiniods are a class of pesticides that came out in 1985, produced by the German company, Bayer. They are related to nicotine and like that drug, they operate on the nervous system. In insects they disrupt the nerve channel which results in death. Gaucho contains Imidacloprid which is one of the more popular forms. It is used on seeds but is taken up by the plant. See http://www.bulletinofinsectology.org...51-057maus.pdf for some Bayer sponsored research. This drug was thought to be the cause of massive die-offs in France (May disease) years ago. It was supposed that affected bees could not navigate home from the fields.. http://www.beekeeping.com/articles/u...prid_bayer.htm Other Neonicotinoids are: acetamiprid (Assail), imidacloprid (Gaucho,Admire,Provado), thiacloprid (Calypso), and thiamethoxam (Actara).
    The report on bee-deaths, published by the French Comité Scientifique et Technique (CST) 2003, shows that the use of the pesticide GAUCHO is jointly responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of bee colonies. Environmental activists and beekeeper unions are calling for a ban on the agricultural toxin The summary of the report states: "The results of the examination on the risks of the seeds-treatment GAUCHO are alarming. The treatment of seeds by GAUCHO is a significant risk to bees in several stages of life." The 108-page report was made by order of the agricultural ministry of France by the universities of Caen and Metz as well as by the Pasteur Institute. http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp...cho_blamed.htm The writer read a lot of old newsblogs on the subject. Here’s a chilling line from one of them: “The researchers also found traces of Imidaproclid in neighboring plants that were not treated by the pesticide.” Gaucho was banned in France until a reassessment could be done in 2006. The ban was upheld in Apr of 06.


    Dickm

  17. #77
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    well I was listening to NPR on the way to work this morning and they cleared it all up for me
    they told me that the bees are all dieing from AIDS!
    whoda thunk it?
    all we need to do is increase funding for AIDS research and all our problems will go away
    to be perfectly honest this was a blurb telling about what they'd be talking about later and they said the bees were dieing from "an AIDS like disease" and I didn't get to hear the actual piece so I don't know what it said but the blurb almost made me run in the ditch

    Dave

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I think many of the conditions being seen in CCD has to do with the bees immune system being weaken or completely gone.

    I gave a talk to the Pennsylvania Franklin County club last night and used AIDS as an example in making points and comparisions. As far as I know, nobody from NPR attended.

    I think its like looking at someone dying from pneumonia, but not realizing it was the lack of an immune system, destroyed by AIDS, that caused the death. I wonder if we are chasing many symptoms triggered after the fact, but by the same collaspe of the bees immune system. (Of course not actually aids)

    We know that many deseases, normally not life threatening, become killers once the immune system fails. AIDS is a great illustration of this. I think the bees are seeing the same type pattern with an immune system being destroyed.

    Dave, I know your post was on a more light-hearted approach. I would probably run off into a ditch also if I heard that on NPR.

    [size="1"][ February 28, 2007, 08:13 PM: Message edited by: BjornBee ][/size]

  19. #79
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Hi Bjorn

    I know there seem to be many problems with bees that appear to involve a compromised immune system
    viruses and such pop to mind
    I was just shocked to hear that on the radio

    Dave

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    >well I was listening to NPR on the way to work this morning and they cleared it all up for me
    they told me that the bees are all dieing from AIDS!

    Interesting since we've known for a very long time that Fluvalinate suppresses the bees' immune system.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads