Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 105
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    I believe they are all working on it....the work on it is not finished but everything keeps pointing that way. My info came from a beekeeper who they had sampled bees from....you may try Maryann.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    >>what are the chances of getting this pesticide banned?
    Gotta prove its the problem first [img]smile.gif[/img] something the French beekeeps had a real hard time with from what I hear.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    You sound like me loggermike...but the systemic Neonicotinoids seem to be the problem. As I kinda said before the chemical companies have already tried to get Penn State to back off! They are dirty and ruthlist....only concerned with $$$$ in their pockets!

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    Its going to be a fight!! From what I hear its going to take $250,000 just to ge tit in front of epa...and the chemical co will put a fight. After Penn St finishes their report a certified lab has to do its research..then it goes before EPA....about as hard to get it banned as get it approved!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >OK, so when I call Penn State on Monday,
    who do I ask for?

    >Diana Cox-Foster, Maryann Frazier, David Geiser,
    Nancy Ostiguy, or Dennis vanEngelsdorp?

    Yes [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    I did a search on yahoo by typing in imidaclopriod. Here is what I found briefly....there will be Sublethal behavior effects at 0.1 ppb a dosage of 50 to 100 times LESS than the lethal effect. Will kill bees at 10 parts per billion an dremains in soil for over 2 yrs at leavels that effect bees. Present in nectar an dpollen at 3-7 parts per billion...(3-7 times higher than required to have sublethall effects on bees causing behavorial problems.) I suggest everyone should go do a search and read about this product!!!

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Darlingford, Manitoba
    Posts
    17

    Post

    Willard,
    Did you report your findings to any relevant person in Canada about your losses - and if so when?

    Following the link supplied to the interviews, it must be noted that systemic insecticides: imidaclopride,clothianidin et thiamethoxam et al. were not mentioned at all by Maryann Frazier. She is part of the investigating group, not DH who presumably only was able to report what he saw.
    I suggest that conversation between beekeepers is useful - but starting a rumour mill is not, especially with something as serious as this situation.
    Also, one has to take great care what and how things are said - Manufacturers of phytoprotection products have long arms and ears.
    Notes are taken and used in the most bizarre manner.

    What will appear in public will often be very muted, with much proceeding in the background, due to legal procedure and strategy.

    Pembinabee

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    here is a good article to read about this
    www.valleyvoicenewspaper.com/vv/stories/beedeaths.htm

    Seems this may be part of the problem weve been having with queens. After reading numerous articles about these insecticides it is clear that we are in trouble regardless what Bayer says! Read how it controls termites....doesnt kill them all but confuses them and the queen and colony dies.. The above article really hits the center...everyone needs to read it along with doing a search and reading about imidacloprid.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983

    Post

    I agree with pemiabee....and for sure all the chemical companies care about is $$$$$. Even if Maryanne didnt say anything I was told from a very reliable source that a chemical company had already tried to get Penn St. to back off....an dwhen it failed at the research level went to the predident. (These companies furnish lots of research $$$) After reading the article in the post before this....it all falls togather
    The nucs I lost in Florida next to DH the queens were laying drones(the ones that were present) The rest were empty hives 3 weeks after 3 frames brood, 1 frame honey and a cell was put in! All during a honey flow....only 30 or so aout of 150 had ANY bees and some of those had drone layers!
    Needless to say we got problems..and I for sure dont think it is a rumor....will it be hard to prove...YES! kinda like arson..hard to catch someone lighting the match! BUt you can bet what the problem is!!!

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Darlingford, Manitoba
    Posts
    17

    Post

    http://www.valleyvoicenewspaper.com/.../beedeaths.htm

    Eric Mussen appears to suggest (if the article correctly prints what was said) that Pesticides are to his mind unlikely to be the cause of population losses since they also occurred during the 1960’s and 1975.
    “This problem isn't brand new. It's something we had before,” he said. “We had the phenomenon in the mid-60s and then again in 1975. These new chemicals weren't on the market then.”

    Since it is not publically known what this bout of CCD is due to, logically it is impossible to state that we have seen it before. The cause in the periods mentioned is unknown.

    During the periods mentioned such compounds as organochlorines (eg. lindane) and organophosphates (eg. parathion), were used indiscriminately during full blooming periods in proximity to bee colonies.

    Should I draw a simple conclusion too ?

    Pembinabee

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    I've not heard that the same symptoms were seen
    in the prior die-offs of the 1960s and 1975,
    where a large fraction of the adult bees are
    "gone", yet the queen, some adults, and a large
    patch of brood, larger than can be explained
    with the worker bees remain.

    Has anyone heard this (that the symptoms ARE
    the same)?

    While I agree that we certainly have had other
    widespread "die offs" decades ago, I don't think
    it is accurate to say that they were related to
    the die off at hand, unless we can at least match
    the overt symptoms.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    17

    Post

    I approached a very knowledgeable Midwest beekeeper which always seems to be a step ahead of most in beekeeping issues.

    I said the CCD bees are gone.

    "Dissappeared off the face of the earth?" was his answer.

    Yup I said! What our researchers and beekeepers are saying!

    The beekeeper laughed.

    Said to take a hive or hives collapsing from CCD to an old abandon airstrip or concrete area for at least a quarter mile in all directions. Then lightly coat the bees with fluorescent paint. Come back at night with a black light and you will quickly find the missing bees and you can observe their symptoms under a bright light.

    A sandy desert location would work also but the concrete location (large parking area) has been used the most.

    Finding the missing bees would be key to finding out what the problem is.

    Made sense to me!

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    4

    Post

    After reading about Imidacloprid and Neonicotinoids in the eariler posts, I ran into this link which I don't think has been posted before.

    web page

    Dave

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Post

    No this chemical is not brand new but it's use has increased many time fold in the last 24 to 36 months. As I said used on lawns for grub contral. How many million pounds of the crap do you suppose this adds up to across this country??? Seed corn treatment, here again how many million pounds of this stuff is used on seed corn across the states???

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    S.E. Oklahoma
    Posts
    337

    Post

    Edit: Moved to a more appropriate post below. Decided this thread was not an appropriate location for opinion. Ooops!

    David

    [size="1"][ February 25, 2007, 08:52 AM: Message edited by: David Stewart ][/size]

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    Do a BEE L search on Imidacloprid .Theres a lot of info there:
    http://listserv.albany.edu:8080/cgi-bin/wa?S1=bee-l
    I wondered how long it would be before it became a suspected problem here.These are big money products for Bayer. Some big toes could potentially get stepped on !

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    4

    Post

    I was reading about some of the problems that they had in France, and after Imidacloprid was banned there was a shift to using pesticides with Fipronil. Problems were also reported with Fipronil killing bees and several pesticides based on it were subsequently banned. Fipronil is the active ingredient in MaxForce Roach baits which some have used to control small hive beetles. From http://www.answers.com/topic/fipronil

    "Fipronil is a slow acting poison, when mixed with a bait it allows the poisoned insect time to return to the colony or haborage. In cockroaches the feces and carcass can contain sufficient residual pesticide to kill others in the same nesting site. In ants, the sharing of the bait among colony members assists in the spreading of the poison through out the colony. With the cascading effect, the projected kill rate is about 95% in 3 days for ants and cockroaches."

    I wonder if small hive beetles exposed to MaxForce roach baits could spread Fipronil though a hive by contact or by their feces and cause a CCD like colony death.

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    imidaclopriod is a very interesting compound. I know that it has been approved for topical use on mammals for decades, but I just recently became aware of its agronomic uses. A few milligrams applied to the back of a dog large dog, and you will literally see dying fleas falling off in minutes. The drug keep killing fleas for 3-4 weeks. I'm sure that it would only take a few micrograms to affect a colonies performance. I really hope that these compounds aren't broadcast into the environment, even if they have nothing to do with CCD.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Fipronyl is another commonly used flea product that kills for 3-4 weeks....

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    Imidacloprid has been used in almond and fruit orchards.
    http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST...-07/p27601.htm
    I don't know the current status of its use, or if it is even a problem for bees.There are plenty of beekeeps who are sure it is a problem.And as pointed out , beekeeps own use and abuse of chemicals will surely enter the equation.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads