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  1. #101
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

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    >Further, from a research point of view (and I am not a researcher), but I would think that the researchers would want to have control of the samples taken, from collection to analysis.

    This is normally a valid concern, but is evidence without a complete and rigorously documented chain of authenticity completely useless? I don't think so. We're not talking about sending an innocent person to the electric chair here, they're investigating dead bees. I'd think that any evidence, even if heavily salted, could prove to be useful.

    I evaluate evidence in my job all the time, and it comes from many sources. Some evidence is more credible than other evidence. You don't hang your hat on non-credible evidence, but sometimes seemingly useless evidence provides a clue for a new direction of investigation. You don't know- and you'll never know, if you don't look at everything you can get your hands on.

    Earlier in this thread, leafcutter mentioned that the CCD group was not pursuing reports from amateur or otherwise inexperienced beekeepers that reported CCD or CCD-like losses, preferring to concentrate on beekeepers that were managing large apiaries. Of course, I don't know if that's true or not because it's hearsay
    Dulcius ex asperis

  2. #102
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    The researchers are awash in samples that were taken properly and stored immediately in alcohol or frozen, dated and moved quickly to a lab. Some of the tests cost $50 EACH. I expect some cost much more. Take 1 bee. Carefully dissect it. Make a slide of it's entrails or breathing apparatus. Look at it through the microscope. Create a report on this. Then take the next bee out of the package, etc, etc. ...and that's the easy stuff. Some of these samples are going to the most sophisticated gas chromatograpy on the planet. Dennis van Englesdorp ( Penn researcher) has a connection with a dude from medical research who can pinpoint any fungus ever recorded. The man is volunteeering his time but the machine needs to be paid. Can you see why, at this point, a baggy full of bees might be turned town? Sure you can. Make a donation if you are frustrated.

    dickm

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    232

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    There is some very interesting info at WNCBEES.org website. You can look for it on the front page under Hot Topics.
    When your ship comes in, make sure you are willing to unload it.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,369

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    >Can you see why, at this point, a baggy full of bees might be turned town?

    Of course. But, there are samples, and there are samples. I refered to vials of bees from a beekeeper who started this CCD thing. These bees were sampled early in the season, and I would think they would be more valuable than just any old sample.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    Jerry Bromenshenk addressed this on Be-L. For those who don't read that illustrious source...he said about what I said above. There isn't enough money to do more than they are doing and they want samples taken the way they take them.

    dickm

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