Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 51
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mountains of western North Carolina
    Posts
    97

    Post

    I've seen several references here to shb coming and going throught the sbb. Has anyone tried a smaller mesh screen? Seems like a mite could drop through a grid that was sufficiently small to deter a shb, and air flow wouldn't be reduced appreciably. Even window screen would do the job, and could be stapled right over the existing screen. This seems like such a simple and obvious trick that I must be missing something.
    Flying by the seat of my pants.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    I don't think a mite would fit through window screen, but you could try.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    I haven't heard of small hive beetles this far north although I expect at some point I will. Which states have problems with these things so far?
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    767

    Post

    SweetBettyBees: I think window screen would get clogged up pretty quick. Adult SHB can't fit through #10 (10 squares per inch) screen but I don't know where this size could be bought. I'm thinking of solid inserts that go above the screen that can be temporarily removed to do mite drop counts. I know, that negates the ventilation feature of SBB.

    All the hive beetles I've observed entering a hive via the bee entrance 1st land on the hive and then crawl through the entrance. Has anyone, seen a beetle fly directly through the entrance like a bee? Can a shb hover like a bee? If they always crawl through, then there is probably an bee-entrance-shb-trap design that would catch nearly all adult shb trying to enter the hive (assuming all other ways of getting in are effectively blocked). Taking advantage of the shb's hard, inflexible body, it should be possible to design a trap that they can easily enter but never exit.

    Triangle Bees

  5. #25

    Post

    Here's some information I have been able to glean on shb:

    Worst time for infestations is mid July thru Aug
    For every adult shb in your hive, there are at least 20 more living in the nearby woods
    The west hive trap works, place them on your weakest hives (2-3 per yard). No need for every hive to have a trap. Caveat hive has to be level, and the oil replaced frequently.
    USDA/U of FL have developed attractant yeasts to trap adult shb, problem no one wants to market the yeasts (build your own trap simular to Yellow Jacket trap)
    In the labratory larva have been able to pupate in borax, and DE, but not dehydrated lime (yes the larva's skin is that tough)
    Hives need full sunlight.
    Honey house rules: 50/50! 50 degrees F and/or 50% humidity. Air conditioner, and/or dehumidifer, and box fans needed if you cant immediately extract.

  6. #26

    Post

    Very helpful discussion. Thanks everyone.

    Here in SE Texas, our beetle problem has multiplied greatly and we are now lousy with shb.

    I’ve made a few mistakes and have learned hard lessons. Here is what I’ve discovered:

    • Strong colonies will not clean shb fouled comb for you
    • Division board feeders equal shb holiday resorts
    • Shade v. Sun: shb reduction costs gallons of perspiration
    • Screened BB provides easy escape route for shb

    With these experiences well scorched on the back of my eyeballs, I have decided to try a few different ideas and would like to ask the learned denizens of this invaluable forum for feedback.

    1. In addition to my regular pale feeders, I wish to give entrance feeders a try.
    2. Instead of using 1/8 wire mesh for Screened BB, use a larger 1/4 mesh to allow the bees to continue the chase.

    I also have interest in corrugated plastic board soaked in FGMO or vinegar.
    Does anyone have any experience with this? How would one apply it?

    Cheers.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Post

    I want to weigh in on this too. I have had a SHB problem for 2 years. Here is what I did to kill these pests. They are not completely gone but are under control now.
    #1 I bought West beetle traps and Hood traps. West work far better, because of a few reasons. They are on the bottom where most of the beetles enter and try to hide. Also the West will catch other larva like wax moth.{which were alive inside the oil when I cleaned it Sunday, strange I thought to my self}.And you don't have to open the hive to clean and inspect the trap.
    #2 I modified my SBB to fit over the West and that allows me to remove it like a sticky board from the rear. Which I like a lot also.
    #3 The Hood did catch some beetles, but not like the West. The girls started to build comb around it and propalize the opening of the trap making it less effective. So I removed them.
    #4 Don't give the beetles any room to roam. I removed any supers that weren't filled at least 50-75%. And combined them to reduce the size of the hive. Girls didn't seem to mind at all.

    In my limited opinion the SHB is here to stay. I will keep my West trap on until winter. Then put back on in the spring. All the other factors listed here are probably correct where they come from, how they reproduce, sunlight or shade, I don't know, but what I do know is the west beetle trap works very well for me.Just my 2 cents worth.
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Texarkana, TX
    Posts
    166

    Post



    [size="1"][ September 18, 2006, 11:49 PM: Message edited by: hrogers ][/size]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    I know one package and queen producer in Mississippi uses a powder coumaphos to treat SHB. The powder is put on the lip that the frames rest on. I used to know the name of the product he uses. It is cattle tick product some of you rancher beekeepers probable know the name. I don’t think I would use this technique myself.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post



    [size="1"][ September 16, 2006, 10:57 PM: Message edited by: magnet-man ][/size]
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    298

    Post

    I was checking a few hives this weekend and noticed, 3 hive beetles taking refuge in a Pierco 1 piece Black frame in the grooved edges. I love these frames but after seeing them in the grooves, I am concerned that these frames grooves act as a refuge
    for beetles. With 10 frames in a box there are many hiding places to get away from the house bees.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    Mobees, I'm not familiar with pierco frames but is it possible for you to fill those gaps? You could fill them with melted wax or even push some crumpled wax into the crevices- anything to fill them up so the shb can't hide there.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    central N.C.
    Posts
    130

    Post

    Magnet-Man I think that is corral.The same chemical that Check Mite is made out of.Anyone fell free to correct me if I'me wrong. (Coumophos)chemical name

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    R.L.Bee,
    corral is biggest contaminator of beeswax ever used in a bee hive according to Jeff Pettis of the bee lab.
    Coumaphos in the form of a chemical strip is the next!
    Comb that has had apistan (fluvalinate) & Checkmite( choumaphos) used creates a contamination issue (according to the bee lab) worse than either used by itself.
    After using both apistan & checkmite and talking to Jeff pettis I changed all my comb. The bees never looked better.
    Contaminated wax is a suttle thing according to Jeff except in cases where corral has been used. Such as cases the lab looked at in Florida where corral had been used.
    Those on beesource which have attended national conventions and heard Jeff Pettis give presentations know the above is true.
    Bob Harrison

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    The only Cor-ral that I have sen are the ear tags. I have never seen it as a powder.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    298

    Post

    The frames are one piece frames you can get from betterbee or other vendor. The are great frames and I have many. We don't or didn't have a hive beetle problem here in Mass/Me. Every year more are showing up. I have killed a hundred or so this year. I have half wood/wax and Pierco frames. Again tonight I noticed 2 beetles crawling inside the groove of the frame where it is molded. It just bothers me that the bees can't chase them out.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    767

    Post

    Is the West shb trap practical for 60-100 hives? How much does it cost and how much labor/time per hive is involved in maintaining it? Is there a way to make a homemade version that could be integrated with the SBB?

    I'm thinking of replacing the SBB inserts to seal off the area under the screen from outside access. If I coat the insert with something that kills any varroa that fall through and catches any shb that fall/run onto it, it could be worth the lost ventilation.

    I havn't heard about any new research going on with SHB. Has anyone heard anything lately? A bacteria like BT to kill the shb larvae would be great.

    Triangle Bees

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Post

    db...several of us are considering making our own beetle traps combined with a SBB. I think I can use food-service plastic,metal or fiberglass trays, or failing that, make shallow trays of galvanized or aluminum sheet, using a sheet-metal brake, which I am in the process of purchasing to make hive covers. The only disadvantage of the west trap in that the hive must be perfectly level. Since you don't have to worry about slanting the hive front-to-back with SBB like you do with solid bottom boards, leveling should be easy.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
    Posts
    125

    Post

    I made some using aluminum cookie sheets...just make sure bees have no way to get into the oil. I had to change them a couple of times before I had a trap that worked without killing bees. Mine can be removed from the back as well. I had to build a a box like structure under the SBB using scrap wood and cheap luan particle board. They work great now so far. They're drowning beetles, larva, moths, and the occassional cockroach. It only cost $3 for the cookie sheet.

    [size="1"][ September 25, 2006, 06:43 PM: Message edited by: Janice Lane ][/size]

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Post

    >Is the West SHB trap practical for 60-100 hives?
    They cost 11.95 from Brushy Mt. Some suggest not having to put them on every hive, I only have 4 hives so the cost wasn't a big issue for me.

    But considering what is a hive worth? SSBs are about the same price, a good super is about the same price.

    I figure one could be made like Janice said, by using a cookie sheet or something that would fit under a SBB and seal of the SBB to keep the girls out.

    But the SBB I got from Betterbee some of the girls can fit threw the screen!

    <I'm thinking of replacing the SBB inserts to seal off the area under the screen from outside access. If I coat the insert with something that kills any varroa that fall through and catches any shb that fall/run onto it, it could be worth the lost ventilation.

    If the girls cant get threw the screen it could work. I have stapled window screen across the rear to keep the girls out and still have ventilation. But that is a pain when I check the tray inside and have to pull the screen off. Been thinking about making a screen door for the rear. One that flips up or down, haven't gotten to it yet though. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads